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(1) a high quality motor shaft that meets with your approval.

(2) a high quality motor shaft that meets your approval.

Which is right or wrong?
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Comments  
neither
Why not Inch?

I think they are both ok but 'meets with' is the most commonly used.
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I agree, but with the caveat that neither is a complete sentence - it is a noun phrase.
Both sound fine to me.
"Which is wrong?" Neither, that is, either is correct.
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I agree with Nona. In AmE, "meets with" is more commonly used. Here's a complete sentence:
  • "I know that you want a high quality motor shaft that meets with your approval."
But now I'm thinking, why include the phrase "high quality"? A motor shaft that meets with one's approval is assumed to be of high quality? Why would you approve a motor shaft of low or middling quality? So, my suggestion to simplify the sentence:
  • "I know that you want a motor shaft that meets with your approval."
Phoenix PRBut now I'm thinking, why include the phrase "high quality"? A motor shaft that meets with one's approval is assumed to be of high quality? Why would you approve a motor shaft of low or middling quality? So, my suggestion to simplify the sentence:

"I know that you want a motor shaft that meets with your approval."
Yes, the whole thing is overwrought, but if we are to simplify, I'd suggest:

Should you have the expertise (and a good car repair shop at your disposal) to test yourself such motorshafts:

I know that you want a motor shaft that meets with your approval.

Should you NOT have the expertise to test yourself such motorshafts:

"I know that you want a high quality motor shaft."
Sure, that works too! I just wanted to keep going with the original train of thought re "meets with your approval."

I trust that meets with your approval. Emotion: smile
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