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Hi,
My acheivements include MSc and BSc in economics both graduated with merit, 60 points in project A and 65 point in project B
My acheivements include MSc and BSc in economics both graduated with merits, 60 points in project A and 65 point in project B

I have 3 questions.

Question1:
In the following sentences, should I use "merit" or "merits"?
Question2:
Could you please improve this part in the sentnce "MSc and BSc in economics both graduated with merit"?
Question3:
Is it suitable to use "graduated"?

Someone sugguests that we should write a BSc / an MSc
Someone sugguests that we should write a BSc degree / an MSc degree.
At this moment, I can't find an universal answer.

Tthanks
Comments 
Hi,

My acheivements include MSc and BSc in economics both graduated with merit, 60 points in project A and 65 point in project B

My acheivements include MSc and BSc in economics both graduated with merits, 60 points in project A and 65 point in project B

I have 3 questions.

Question1:
In the following sentences, should I use "merit" or "merits"?

I haven't seen the word 'merit' used in a context like this.

The common terminology, at least in Britain, is to speak of 'Honours' - 'a degree with Honours', 'an Honours degree'.

Question2:
Could you please improve this part in the sentnce "MSc and BSc in economics both graduated with merit"?

You normally speak only of your highest degree in a subject, so I would only mention the MSc.

I suggest My achievements include an MSc in Economics.

I may be wrong, but I think only Bachelor degrees involve Honours.

When you tell people you have an MSc, that's enough. They don't care about your points and projects. To speak of them sounds rather trivial, in my opinion.

Question3:
Is it suitable to use "graduated"? If you say you have the degree, it's obvious that you graduated, so don't say that.

Someone sugguests that we should write a BSc / an MSc
Someone sugguests that we should write a BSc degree / an MSc degree. You don't need the word 'degree'. People know these are degrees.

At this moment, I can't find an universal answer.

Clive
First, the correct spelling is achievement.

Also, I believe the term used in the US is "with honors" rather than "with merit." I am not familiar with the "points" part of it. That is not commonly used.

You can say either an MSc or an MSc degree. Also, you can use the abbreviations BS or MS (these also stand for bachelor of science and master of science and are more commonly used).

So, I would say: My academic achievements include a BS and an MS in economics, both with honors. (Use "an" before "MS" because the "m" has a vowel sound when it is pronounced.)