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I don't write to them that way. Sometimes i'm practical, more formal.

I didn't for a second imagine it. I hoped you'd know I was stirring (light-heartedly).

Well, I wonder why total strangers at M-W warrant more consideration than we do.

Mike.
("Hispanic")
What do BrE speakers think it means, since they are closer to Spain? Wouldn't the primary connotation have to do with Spain?

It's a bit of a tricky one from a British perspective, because the US usage is very well known. But, trying to give an honest answer to the question, "Iberian" would probably be the preferred term to embrace Spain and Portugal (without upsetting the Portuguese by using an apparently "Spain-only" term). Though certainly anyone of education would be able to work out that "Hispanic" ought to be allowed to refer (even if not exclusively) to Spain.

My instinct would be to object to M-W's apparent hijacking of the word - just as I would object to "South of the border" being defined as "in Mexico".
Regards
Jonathan
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
("Followup-To:" header set to alt.usage.english.)
It's a bit of a tricky one from a British perspective, because the US usage is very well known.

Speaking of US usages that are well-known, I was listening to Bibbacy Weld this morning and some guy with an Estuary accent was talking about "motherhood and apple pie" in the context of British national politics. I was like, has this AmE notion been adopted in the UK?

Salvatore Volatile
("Hispanic")

What do BrE speakers think it means, since they are closer to Spain? Wouldn't the primary connotation have to do with Spain?

It's a bit of a tricky one from a British perspective, because the US usage is very well known. But, ... would be able to work out that "Hispanic" ought to be allowed to refer (even if not exclusively) to Spain.

I wouldn't think of "Hispanic" as applying to Portuguese, only to Spanish culture, customs etc.
"Iberian" is a bit ambiguous, as it can mean Caucasian as well as Spanish and Portuguese.
My instinct would be to object to M-W's apparent hijacking of the word - just as I would object to "South of the border" being defined as "in Mexico".

I wouldn't say it's hijacking, just rather narrow and ethnocentric.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
("Followup-To:" header set to alt.usage.english.)
"Iberian" is a bit ambiguous, as it can mean Caucasian as well as Spanish and Portuguese.

Huh? You sure that Basque is related to Georgian?

Salvatore Volatile
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I didn't for a second imagine it. I hoped you'd know I was stirring (light-heartedly).

Well, I wonder why total strangers at M-W warrant more consideration than we do.

I have no idea what you're talking about. If you have a problem, out with it!
I don't discriminate. I'm willing to help anyone. I'm more willing to be lighthearted with someone I know, who I think is less likely to take it the wrong way.
I'm OK, you're OK.

Stephen
Lennox Head, Australia
(snip discussion of lower case i)
Well, I wonder why total strangers at M-W warrant more consideration than we do.

I have no idea what you're talking about. If you have a problem, out with it!

It wasn't you. Mike wondered if xerlome could treat us to some capital-I's, since xerlome uses capital-I's for complete strangers like Merriam-Webster staff.

Best Donna Richoux
Well, I wonder why total strangers at M-W warrant more consideration than we do.

I have no idea what you're talking about. If you have a problem, out with it! I don't discriminate. I'm ... with someone I know, who I think is less likely to take it the wrong way. I'm OK, you're OK.

I was adding to your commentary on i's communication with M-W, with special reference to the first person personal pronoun. I'm disappointed that wasn't immediately obvious: I must try harder.

Mike.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I was adding to your commentary on i's communication with M-W, with special reference to the first person personal pronoun. I'm disappointed that wasn't immediately obvious: I must try harder.

Nah mate it's me who has to try harder. I misread you. No problem.

Stephen
Lennox Head, Australia
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