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I wrote a critical letter to Macquarie about their execrable definition= of accountant and got no reply.

What definition is that ?

In giving it, I emphasise that it is not typical and that Macquarie=20 should not be judged by its worst example.
accountant
"noun a person whose profession is analysing and communicating economic =

information for the judgement and decision-making of individuals and=20 organisations who seek it."

>

Compare with the SOED (2002):
noun 2 A professional keeper and inspector of accounts; an officer in a=20 public office who has charge of the accounts.
Merriam-Webster's 10th Collegiate:
noun 2 : one who is skilled in the practice of accounting or who is in=20 charge of public or private accounts.
=20
Stephen
Lennox Head, Australia
If they have operatives here reading this thread, they may become reluctant to be as forthcoming with their responses to the public in general. Maybe that's far fetched, but i don't know.

Nah, but they might form an opinion about the value of your lexical contributions from the fact that you spell their word as though it were two words!
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What definition is that ?

In giving it, I emphasise that it is not typical and that Macquarie should not be judged by its worst ... and communicating economic information for the judgement and decision-making of individuals and organisations who seek it." My letter said:(...sound stuff...)

It strikes me that the Macquarie definition fits an economist better than an accountant. I have no idea what the "for the judgement..."etc bit is there for, and "who seek it" seems like the kind of thing a kid would drop in (as it were, "an ice-cream man sells ice-cream to people who want it".
Shocking lexicography. I nominate it as the first declared runner in a new AUE-type game of finding the worst definition in a standard dictionary. "One-and-a-half to one, the field!"

Mike.
(...about Macquarie...)
Back to M-W. While I'm in the thread, and if it hasn't been covered already, can a dictionary really get an erection?

Mike.
What definition is that ?

>

Bookkeepers record. Auditors verify. Not all accountants give advice on tax.

I don't know where in the world you are posting from but it's clear to me that you have little knowledge of what accountants do.
Compare with the SOED (2002): noun 2 A professional keeper and inspector of accounts; an officer in a public office ... : one who is skilled in the practice of accounting or who is in charge of public or private accounts.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
(...sound stuff...) It strikes me that the Macquarie definition fits an economist better than an accountant. I have no idea ... of thing a kid would drop in (as it were, "an ice-cream man sells ice-cream to people who want it".

Is the point perhaps that an economist may work independently of any client, often as an academic, whereas an accountant is employed by someone who has practical reasons ("judgment and decision-making") to pay for his or her services? (Some say the accountant is paid to come up with whatever answer the client wants, but that must be mere cynicism . . .)

Alan Jones
accountant "noun a person whose profession is analysing and communicating economic information for the judgement and decision-making of individuals and ... who records and verifies accounts of income and expenditure (OR profit and loss) and advises on financial and taxation matters.>>

my current understanding is that a run of the mill accountant cannot legally give "financial advice" to a client in Oz. You must use a recognised "financial adviser" ... which could actually be an accountant with appropriate accreditation.
It is unclear to me whether "give" means offer, proffer, provide, hint, talk off the culf or just plain suggest.
However, taking up your point about economics, an appropriate definition might be;
"noun one who records, analyses and communicates financial information for those who require it."
Shocking lexicography. I nominate it as the first declared runner in a new AUE-type game of finding the worst definition in a standard dictionary. "One-and-a-half to one, the field!"

The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary (1988 reprint of a 1983 edition):

Enlightenment ... 2. (after G. Aufklaerung.) Shallow and pretentious intellectualism, unreasonable contempt for authority and tradition, etc.; applied esp. to the spirit and aims of the French philosophers of the 18th c. 1865.
There isn't, alas, a definition of "Nouvelle Vague".

V
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Bookkeepers record. Auditors verify. Not all accountants give advice on tax. I don't know where in the world you are posting from but it's clear to me that you have little knowledge of what accountants do.

Compare with the SOED (2002): noun 2 A professional keeper ... or who is in charge of public or private accounts.

they might remove the problem). For some reason the Macq. doesn't ring as true to us non-accountants as it does to you. What would you suggest to bridge the gap? Would it be fair, and would it be sufficient, to put "financial" instead of "economic" in the Macq def, and maybe remove some of what seems extraneous to me?

Mike.
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