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I have had very little luck with some people in getting them to remember my real first name. It is "Alec", but many people, including my direct superiors, never seemed to catch on that it is not the same as "Alex".

These people obviously had taken the trouble to learn about Latvian male names, which invariably end in -s. Knowing you were from Latvia, they could not help hearing the final s. They were really calling you "Alecs".
I have had very little luck with some people in getting them to remember my real first name. It is "Alec", but many people, including my direct superiors, never seemed to catch on that it is not the same as "Alex".

These people obviously had taken the trouble to learn about Latvian male names, which invariably end in -s. Knowing you were from Latvia, they could not help hearing the final s. They were really calling you "Alecs".
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I have had very little luck with some people in getting them to remember my real first name. It is "Alec", but many people, including my direct superiors, never seemed to catch on that it is not the same as "Alex".

These people obviously had taken the trouble to learn about Latvian male names, which invariably end in -s. Knowing you were from Latvia, they could not help hearing the final s. They were really calling you "Alecs".
I have had very little luck with some people in getting them to remember my real first name. It is "Alec", but many people, including my direct superiors, never seemed to catch on that it is not the same as "Alex".

These people obviously had taken the trouble to learn about Latvian male names, which invariably end in -s. Knowing you were from Latvia, they could not help hearing the final s. They were really calling you "Alecs".
I have had very little luck with some people in getting them to remember my real first name. It is "Alec", but many people, including my direct superiors, never seemed to catch on that it is not the same as "Alex".

These people obviously had taken the trouble to learn about Latvian male names, which invariably end in -s. Knowing you were from Latvia, they could not help hearing the final s. They were really calling you "Alecs".
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I have had very little luck with some people in getting them to remember my real first name. It is "Alec", but many people, including my direct superiors, never seemed to catch on that it is not the same as "Alex".

These people obviously had taken the trouble to learn about Latvian male names, which invariably end in -s. Knowing you were from Latvia, they could not help hearing the final s. They were really calling you "Alecs".
I have had very little luck with some people in getting them to remember my real first name. It is "Alec", but many people, including my direct superiors, never seemed to catch on that it is not the same as "Alex".

These people obviously had taken the trouble to learn about Latvian male names, which invariably end in -s. Knowing you were from Latvia, they could not help hearing the final s. They were really calling you "Alecs".
I have had very little luck with some people in getting them to remember my real first name. It is "Alec", but many people, including my direct superiors, never seemed to catch on that it is not the same as "Alex".

These people obviously had taken the trouble to learn about Latvian male names, which invariably end in -s. Knowing you were from Latvia, they could not help hearing the final s. They were really calling you "Alecs".
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I think that what is required is this: A new acquaintance must hear a correction every time without fail, and it must happen immediately, before the next phrase or even word.

Are you suggesting that each time I hear "are-MONDE," I interrupt with "that's ARE-mund" or similar? Not sure I can routinely bring myself to do that.
Best is if he also hears the correction out of his own mouth, meaning that you continue prompting until he says the name correctly, and do not let him get away with a "whatever" or a swallow and a nod.

So this becomes a sort of instructional or positive reinforcement thing?
This takes practice to get the rhythm right. Try it first on completely new acquaintances. Also, since people learn names from the way other people in the group say them, it will probably work best in a new setting.

I may have not indicated it specifically, but this mispronunciation is not universal. I would guess maybe 10 to 15 % of my new acquaintances seem to have a problem pronouncing my name as I prefer it to be pronounced. When I introduce myself, I never mispronounce my own name of course, but about 10 to 15 % of the time it comes back incorrectly. When that happens I sometimes "coach" my new acquaintance, but I am not in the business of intentionally generating friction so my response varies quite a bit.
Once you get the practice grooved so that it is not an effort for you, it will be more effective and will probably only take at most three iterations for each new acquaintance.

As I mentioned not every new acquaintance refuses to hear what is being said. It seems there is a type of individual who hears things as he or she thinks they should be heard or understood, and then proceeds on his or her merry way.
These are the assholes I'm referring to.
So, build up your strength by practicing with a few new acquaintances individually, then take on the next new yacht club as a group.

I don't really think this has been an issue at yachts clubs. I frequent them so rarely that it's hard to be sure.

Good luck and good sailing.
s/v Kerry Deare of Barnegat
http://kerrydeare.home.comcast.net /
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