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Seems odd to me that anyone other than someone you know would mis-spellyour name.

I know many people who know me in person, but who only occasionally write to me. It is they who frequently misspell my name.

Well, then, it's perfectly understandable.
And if they do know you, it would seem rather churlish to respond in the way you suggest.

If they know me, it would seem rude in the extreme to misspell my name.

Don't be daft. How does it compare with spitting in your face or slandering you to your friends?
Adrian
I know many people who know me in person, but who only occasionally write to me. It is they who frequently misspell my name.

Well, then, it's perfectly understandable.

Why? They've already had to type "graeme" twice to get my email address, so why should they then revert to "Graham" in the body of the email?
If they know me, it would seem rude in the extreme to misspell my name.

Don't be daft. How does it compare with spitting in your face or slandering you to your friends?

They all do that!

Graeme Thomas
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
It seems there is a type of individual who hears things as he or she thinks they should be heard or understood, and then proceeds on his or her merry way.

It occurs to me that my own automatic response when hearing someone's name for the first time is to think of it as it's spelt (or as I conceive it to be spelt: if I really can't visualize the spelling I'll ask). I remember words eidetically by spelling. So I could imagine correctly filing away your name in my memory but 'reading' it incorrectly when retrieving it. (If that makes sense to anyone else.)

Katy Jennison
spamtrap: remove the first two letters after the @
I have had very little luck with some people in ... catch on that it is not the same as "Alex".

These people obviously had taken the trouble to learn about Latvian male names, which invariably end in -s. Knowing you were from Latvia, they could not help hearing the final s. They were really calling you "Alecs".

"Alec" is not my Latvian name. I took it at naturalization. The people who mispronounced my name didn't even know that a Latvia existed. When I told them that I'm Latvian, they typically asked "What's that?" Now that the Warriors basketball team has drafted a Latvian player Andris Biedrins (diacritics on the last two letters omitted) maybe a few more people around here will get some vague ideas about Latvia's existence.

Geography is not a subject that the typical American is keen on.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
I think that what is required is this: A new ... must happen immediately, before the next phrase or even word.

Are you suggesting that each time I hear "are-MONDE," I interrupt with "that's ARE-mund" or similar? Not sure I can routinely bring myself to do that.

Why? I mean, I think I have a reasonable sense of politeness, at least in US practices, and I don't think people would find it terribly offensive to be corrected in that way. Not if it was done good-naturedly and clearly. People might feel grateful to be set straight immediately and not discover they'd been saying your name wrong for years.

Oh is that what the problem is? Not correcting new acquaintances but old-timers? Yes, I see that you say that in another place.

My main suggestion is, does your version of Armond rhyme with anything? Because if you can give people a simple rhyme to associate with it, preferably something with a pleasant visual image, it really can help. I'm going through the alphabet and coming up blank, though.

Oh, is it like Arm and Hammer? The logo for the baking soda, and I think the Communist Party?
Have you tried working your own name into stories? "So I said to myself, Armand, Armand, won't you ever learn.."

Best Donna Richoux
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
My main suggestion is, does your version of Armond rhyme with anything? Because if you can give people a simple ... though. Oh, is it like Arm and Hammer? The logo for the baking soda, and I think the Communist Party?

The Communist Party logo had a hammer and sickle.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
My main suggestion is, does your version of Armond rhyme with anything? Because if you can give people a simple ... something with a pleasant visual image, it really can help. I'm going through the alphabet and coming up blank, though.

Almond.
Geography is not a subject that the typical American is keen on.

You have to account, too, for the fact that when many of us learned geography, Latvia wasn't a country. It was part of a country, like Oaxaca, Queensland, Gelderland, or Thuringia. The only countries whose minor divisions I remember spending much time on were the US, Canada, and the UK. The USSR was probably next.
I knew roughly where it was, of course, but I doubt that I could confidently put the Baltics in order from memory.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >It is one thing to be mistaken; it is
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >quite another to be willfullyPalo Alto, CA 94304 >ignorant

(650)857-7572
http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Well, then, it's perfectly understandable.

Why? They've already had to type "graeme" twice to get my email address, so why should they then revert to "Graham" in the body of the email?

Maybe they didn't type "Graeme"; maybe they just clicked on one of your emails and hit "reply", or clicked on "G Thomas" in their contacts list.
Don't be daft. How does it compare with spitting in your face or slandering you to your friends?

They all do that!

Aw.
Adrian
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