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I know there are many persons named Armond who pronounce their own name "are-MONDE," but as far as I'm concerned ... must obey my wishes. I suggest that there are broader applications for such techniques beyond addressing my obvious vanity. ...

When people write to me addressing me as "Graham", I usually reply with "who?" That might work for the spoken name, too.

Graeme Thomas
I know there are many persons named Armond who pronounce their own name "are-MONDE," but as far as I'm concerned ... must obey my wishes. I suggest that there are broader applications for such techniques beyond addressing my obvious vanity. ...

When people write to me addressing me as "Graham", I usually reply with "who?" That might work for the spoken name, too.

Graeme Thomas
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
It's not difficult: when you hear someone say your name wrong, you just interject, in a normal speaking tone, the correct pronunciation.

I usually cannot bring myself to say something like "It's pronounced so-and-so" but I have tried what you suggest and it doesn't seem to getthe point across.

I'm not saying it's a quick fix; I just think it's the simplest and best solution. It's good for you because you are expressing yourself, rather than bottling up the problem. It's good for your relationship with the other person because you are not forcing a discussion on what is, like it or not, a minor issue. You are giving the other person the choice: continue speaking, or stop and be educated**. Some people won't notice what you're doing until the fourth or fifth occasion, but that's fine. The people you have to worry about are those that never pick up on it, but there may be reasons other than gross ignorance for this, so make allowances, and, if necessary, have a quiet word in their shell-like.
**A few clever people will be educated /en passant/, without stopping.
It's similar to what one encounters with certain people who do not listen closely when introduced to someone new, and ... the example athand, certain folks make almost no effort to learn the preferred (by thenamed, that is) pronunciation.

I'm in the former camp , but I would never dream of ignoring a request from someone to pronounce their name in a certain way.

Adrian
My first name is Armond. I pronounce my name "R-mund" (accent on thefirst syllable). I have been using this name ... they must obey my wishes. I suggest that there are broader applications for such techniques beyond addressing my obvious vanity.

I just let people call me whatever they like (as long as it's not too insulting). I get "John" and "Tom" and "Dan" all the time. They eventually figure it out. The longer it takes them, the more embarrassed they eventually are, but they generally get over it.
I always thought that I had a last name (Gilmore) that was impossible to mispronounce, but I had several European college professors that pronounced it "Jillmore".
I also get people who want to nickname me, like "Donnie" or use my full name "Donald". Whatever... I guess it makes them happy. Around here we say, "Call me what you want, just don't call me late for supper!"

Don
Kansas City
I have had very little luck with some people in getting them to remembermy real first name. It is "Alec", ... eventually I gave up. After all, they were bosses, and I could not expect them to beparticularly attentive to detail.

-)
And here you have to contend with the added problem of the phantom-S meme, which seems lodged in most people's brains, and causes them to call "Scalextric" "Scalextrix", "Trivial Pursuit" "Trivial Pursuits", "Spitting Image" "Spitting Images", ad lib to fade.
Adrian
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Armond Perretta filted: Mispronounce their names...address "Steve" with a short ... up wrong names for them...call "David" George, and "Kevin" Betty..r

I was aiming for "polite" but if there's no way to reach my objective, I'll give it a try.

There may not be a polite way - nor, indeed any - way to persuade some people to pronounce your name the way you want it pronounced.

I have an acquaintance whose name is 'Nina', pronounced "nine-a". She explains to anyone who pronounces it 'neen-a' that her parents chose the pronunciation, and she prefers it that way. Some people just carry on regardless.
At my brother's wedding, the Registrar repeatedly mispronounced my brother's name, despite my brother correcting him each time, with ever-increasing irritation. Of course, his irritation might have been made worse by the fact that my mother and I were having trouble concealing our laughter at the exchanges.
Fran
When people write to me addressing me as "Graham", I usually reply with "who?" That might work for the spoken name, too.

Have you tried that on US speakers that call you "Gram"? Or is that pronunciation only used when talking about the crackers?
When people write to me addressing me as "Graham", I usually reply with "who?" That might work for the spoken name, too.

Have you tried that on US speakers that call you "Gram"? Or is that pronunciation only used when talking about the crackers?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
When people write to me addressing me as "Graham", I usually reply with "who?" That might work for the spoken name, too.

Have you tried that on US speakers that call you "Gram"? Or is that pronunciation only used when talking about the crackers?
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