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What do you mean?

I know what he means. (I believe he was referring to his earlier post, which was in response to one of mine.) If you read it, you'll see what I mean.

He may have been referring to the second parenthetical in "Otis's brand name for them is (or has been) "Travolator", and in Britain some people use that (often variously misspelled) as if it was a generic term."

John Varela
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Skitt's recent message quoted above has this number on U.S. SuperNews: Xref: sn-us alt.usage.english:974643

This message is 957902 on earthlink's server.

John Varela
(Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)
I apologize for munging the address but the spam was too much.
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I know what he means. (I believe he was referring ... mine.) If you read it, you'll see what I mean.

He may have been referring to the second parenthetical in "Otis's brand name for them is (or has been) "Travolator", and in Britain some people use that (often variously misspelled) as if it was a generic term."

In which case, Travolator(tm) would be the brand name, and "travelator" the generic term. I'm not sure whether the one at Bank station was made by Otis, but it was described in a document as a "travelator", and, since I was living in London when I first saw the word, was sufficiently curious to go and see it.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Mark Brader:
Otis's brand name for them is (or has been) "Travolator", ... (often variously misspelled) as if it was a generic term."

Steve Hayes:
In which case, Travolator(tm) would be the brand name, and "travelator" the generic term.

I think those who believe in respecting trademarks would disagree.
I'm not sure whether the one at Bank station was made by Otis...

Two at Bank station, actually. (One going each way.) The ones Steve went to see were indeed made by Otis, although their replacements in use today are from CNIM. See (and for the history of the Waterloo & City Line).

Mark Brader, Toronto > The real trouble with this world of ours is... that (Email Removed) > it is nearly reasonable, but not quite. Chesterton

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Mark Brader: Steve Hayes:

In which case, Travolator(tm) would be the brand name, and "travelator" the generic term.

I think those who believe in respecting trademarks would disagree.

So is "travelator" a registered trade mark? My dictionary is silent on the subject, though it does say that "escalator" was originally a trademark.

Perhaps we'd better stick to "moving stairs" and "moving pavement".

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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So is "travelator" a registered trade mark?

"Travelator" is a registered trademark in the US for:

electronic pocket-sized personal money management device, namely, an electronic unit that is used in the tracking of expenditures and daily spending allowances, creating reports regarding expenditures and spending allowances, and for converting currencies that incorporates a calculator, an electronic calendar and a clock.
The trademark referred to in this thread is "Trav-o-lator", owned by the Otis Elevator company, directed to "endless conveyors".

Interestingly enough, the USPTO itself does not respect the "Trav-o-lator" trademark, or so it would seem. It says that the registered trademark "Escalator Information Systems" relates to
advertising agencies specializing in promoting the goods and services of others by affixing advertisements and brand logos to escalator and travelator steps
So is "travelator" a registered trade mark?

"Travelator" is a registered trademark in the US for: electronic pocket-sized personal money management device, namely, an electronic unit that ... reports regarding expenditures and spending allowances, and for converting currencies that incorporates a calculator, an electronic calendar and a clock.

And those existed before 1966, when I first encountered "travelator" used aas a generic term for a moving pavement?

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
"Travelator" is a registered trademark in the US for: electronic ... that incorporates a calculator, an electronic calendar and a clock.

And those existed before 1966, when I first encountered "travelator" used aas a generic term for a moving pavement?

Doesn't look like it, no. BTW, you're lucky that Dawna Richoux is away.
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