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When people write to me addressing me as "Graham", I usually reply with "who?" That might work for the spoken name, too.

Have you tried that on US speakers that call you "Gram"? Or is that pronunciation only used when talking about the crackers?
When people write to me addressing me as "Graham", I usually reply with "who?" That might work for the spoken name, too.

Have you tried that on US speakers that call you "Gram"? Or is that pronunciation only used when talking about the crackers?
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When people write to me addressing me as "Graham", I usually reply with "who?" That might work for the spoken name, too.

Have you tried that on US speakers that call you "Gram"? Or is that pronunciation only used when talking about the crackers?
I know there are many persons named Armond who pronounce ... broader applications for suchtechniques beyond addressing my obvious vanity. ...

When people write to me addressing me as "Graham", I usually reply with "who?" That might work for the spoken name, too.

Seems odd to me that anyone other than someone you know would mis-spell your name. And if they do know you, it would seem rather churlish to respond in the way you suggest.
Adrian
I know there are many persons named Armond who pronounce ... broader applications for suchtechniques beyond addressing my obvious vanity. ...

When people write to me addressing me as "Graham", I usually reply with "who?" That might work for the spoken name, too.

Seems odd to me that anyone other than someone you know would mis-spell your name. And if they do know you, it would seem rather churlish to respond in the way you suggest.
Adrian
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add an extra O to "Bob"..

The polite way to do that is "Bobo".

Joe Fineman (Email Removed)
When people write to me addressing me as "Graham", I usually reply with "who?" That might work for the spoken name, too.

Have you tried that on US speakers that call you "Gram"? Or is that pronunciation only used when talking about the crackers?

I know dialects and idiolects differ on this pernt, but in my dialect "gram" and "Graham" and "graham" and, I guess, "Graeme" all have the same pronunciation, rhyming with "spam" and "jam" and so forth.

Strangely enough, and I've remarked upon this before, I heard my sister some years ago pronounce "Graham" (as in the cracker) as "grayum" /[email protected]/, two syllables, which I gather is how a lot of people pronounce the name "Graham" when they don't pronounce it identically to "gram". My sister and I grew up in the same house (= BrE 'hice', EstE 'hass'?) and neighborhood and even went to the same elementary (= BrE 'primary') school (and even the same secondary school for two years); however, she's
8 years older than I (am). I suppose she might have picked up the"grayum" pronunciation later on in life, but it seems like an odd thing to pick up.
I imagine an Upper Midwestern speaker like erk might not even understand what I'm talking from, what with the vowel shift and all. A Southern US speaker would probably have even more trouble.
Joe Fineman filted:
add an extra O to "Bob"..

The polite way to do that is "Bobo".

ObTangent: I received an e-mail yesterday with the following subject line:

(Re) Hello! bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob bob
Any of you buffaloes want to try punctuating that one?...(sadly, the content didn't live up to the packaging; it turned out to be just another spam offering me "hot pix of teenies")..r
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add an extra O to "Bob"..

The polite way to do that is "Bobo".

I prefer the vocative: "O Bob."
Not that anyone pays any attention.

Obob Lieblich
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