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And here you have to contend with the added problem of the phantom-S meme, which seems lodged in most people's brains, and causes them to call "Scalextric" "Scalextrix", "Trivial Pursuit" "Trivial Pursuits", "Spitting Image" "Spitting Images", ad lib to fade.

Don't forget Silver Spring(s), Maryland, part of the Greater Laurelplex. It's one test of DC area residency. McLean, ("mc'lain"), Virginia, is a second. A third is standing to the right on the Metro escalators, and a fourth is wearing long pants. But finding your way on the Northern Virginia roadways buffaloes almost everyone resident and tourist alike. Ask R.J.

Bob Lieblich
Whose pants are long
Armond Perretta wrote on 29 Jun 2004:
My first name is Armond. I pronounce my name "R-mund" (accent on the first syllable). I have been using this ... must obey my wishes. I suggest that there are broader applications for such techniques beyond addressing my obvious vanity. ...

I think it's a lost cause. My best friend in LA insists on spelling my Taiwanese wife's name "Ling-Yi", probably because he knows someone else with a similar Chinese name who spells the second syllable "Yi" (pronounced as (i)), the "normal" romanizatioin for this Chinese name. On every letter and email I've sent him in the 8 years my wife and I have been married, I've spelt her name "Ling-I", the way she romanizes it (and always has). My LA friend is unable to change his ways because he has a fixed notion of what he thinks is the "correct" spelling, despite his not knowing anything about the Chinese language.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I know dialects and idiolects differ on this pernt, but in my dialect "gram" and "Graham" and "graham" and, I ... I'm talking from, what with the vowel shift and all. A Southern US speaker would probably have even more trouble.

"Graham" (the first name) is "Gra-um" to me; "Graham" (the surname) is "Gra-m," that is, just a shade more than one syllable; "graham" (the cracker) is usually "gra-m" also. But none of that is written in cement. I can switch at a moment's notice, and I think that there's no one and only official pronunciation for any of the G/grahams.

So if one of your names is Graham (no matter how it's spelled), just say how you want it said.
As for "Armond" Perretta, I automatically thought of it as AR-mond before this thread. Had the last name been "Paquette" (or something similar), I would have gone with ar-MON with the N not quite all there. I'm not saying that's correct, just that that's how I'd pronounce it.

OBediting: I've edited this post a few times for clarity. It may now contain some inexplicable errors.
Maria Conlon, Midwest resident; southern roots.
There aren't very many men's names that have multiple pronunciations. MAUR-ice and Mau-REESE is the only pair I can think ... certain Maurice expected his name to be said one way, I might certainly forget and say it the other.

If I may suggest how to remember which is which: don't think of the spelling of the name. Remember each name by sound. A child who doesn't know how to spell would never mistake MAUR-ice for Mau-REESE.
I usually cannot bring myself to say something like "It's pronounced so-and-so" but I have tried what you suggest and it doesn't seem to get the point across.

Try a different approach: don't even mention the word "pronounciation". Just say no,
"my name is not "ar MOND", my name is "R-mond"".
I have a similar problem with my given name, when many people pronounce it American. When some people insist in educating me about how I should pronounce my name, I tell them to take it up with my mother: next time she'll have another daughter to name her the way they suggest.(My father passed away, which makes it even more unlikely there will ever be another...Arcadian)
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I have had very little luck with some people in getting them to remember my real first name. It is ... I gave up. After all, they were bosses, and I could not expect them to be particularly attentive to detail.

You mean those people never heard of Sir Alex Guinness, or Alex Baldwin?
My best friend in LA insists on spelling my Taiwanese wife's name "Ling-Yi", probably because he knows someone else with ... a fixed notion of what he thinks is the "correct" spelling, despite his not knowing anything about the Chinese language.

Maybe "Ling-Yi" it's just a nickname. Some people alter the names of their relatives or close friends, as terms of endearment.
I prefer the vocative: "O Bob."

I prefer Obbo, because it rhymes with oboe.
Not that anyone pays any attention.

Not that my preferences are given any consideration here.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I have had very little luck with some people in getting them to remember my real first name. It is ... I gave up. After all, they were bosses, and I could not expect them to be particularly attentive to detail.

I used to know someone called 'Alex', who complained that he was always being called 'Alec'. Perhaps you could swap names with him.

Fran
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