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I have had very little luck with some people in ... could not expect them to be particularly attentive to detail.

You mean those people never heard of Sir Alex Guinness, or Alex Baldwin?

Hee, hee. Possibly. Likely, actually.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
I have had very little luck with some people in ... could not expect them to be particularly attentive to detail.

I used to know someone called 'Alex', who complained that he was always being called 'Alec'. Perhaps you could swap names with him.

No way! I picked my own name.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Armond Perretta filted:

I know there are many persons named Armond who pronounce ... broader applications for such techniques beyond addressing my obvious vanity.

Mispronounce their names...address "Steve" with a short E, call "Brian" Brain, put the accent on the second syllable in "Dennis", ... doesn't work, and it won't for everyone, just start making up wrong names for them...call "David" George, and "Kevin" Betty..r

And you can call me Betty and I can call you Al...

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
My first name is Armond. I pronounce my name "R-mund" (accent on the first syllable). I have been using this name for almost 62 years and I have grown used to its faults and virtues. I definitely cannot be argued out of my pronunciation preference.

My sister-in-law twice removed is named Margot. She is called "Ma got" by the family, though most English speakers pronounce the name "Ma go".

I can only think of methods of impolite instruction - like usuing unusual stress patterns when speaking the names of those who misponounce yours.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Have you tried that on US speakers that call you "Gram"? Or is that pronunciation only used when talking about the crackers?

I know dialects and idiolects differ on this pernt, but in my dialect "gram" and "Graham" and "graham" and, I guess, "Graeme" all have the same pronunciation, rhyming with "spam" and "jam" and so forth.

In South Africa, Graham is pronounced "Grayyim" and Graeme is pronounced "Graim" (to rhyme with "brain".

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Don't forget Silver Spring(s), Maryland, part of the Greater Laurelplex. It's one test of DC area residency. McLean, ("mc'lain"), Virginia, is a second.

Isn't that the usual pronunciation of "McLean" as a surname (and it's not an uncommon Hiberno-Britic(TM) surname)? Granite, it also looks like it could be the name of a low-fat McDonald's hamburger.
A third is standing to the right on the Metro escalators,

They got that idear from New York.
When people write to me addressing me as "Graham", I usually reply with "who?" That might work for the spoken name, too.

Have you tried that on US speakers that call you "Gram"? Or is that pronunciation only used when talking about the crackers?

So far that hasn't been an issue. Few Americans of my acquaintance know of the connection between "Graeme" and "Graham", and so don't try to pronounce my name with their peculiar version of the latter.

Graeme Thomas
Seems odd to me that anyone other than someone you know would mis-spell your name.

I know many people who know me in person, but who only occasionally write to me. It is they who frequently misspell my name.
And if they do know you, it would seem rather churlish to respond in the way you suggest.

If they know me, it would seem rude in the extreme to misspell my name.
Graeme Thomas
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Don't forget Silver Spring(s), Maryland, part of the Greater Laurelplex. It's one test of DC area residency. McLean, ("mc'lain"), Virginia, is a second. A third is standing to the right on the Metro escalators, and a fourth is wearing long pants.

Hey, I'm glad you mentioned that last one.
But finding your way on the Northern Virginia roadways buffaloes almost everyone resident and tourist alike. Ask R.J.

When I used to drive around Arlington, I found it useful to look for the airplanes heading in to DCA as a way of figuring out which direction my car was pointed when I couldn't find the sun or the North Star. It would've been helpful if Arlington's planners hadn't decided to use numbered street names for a grid of cul-de-sacs that only barely line up with each other, causing there to be a slew of tiny streets named (e.g.) "North Fourth Street" that aren't connected to one another.
Nowadays my days are mostly given over to bicycling around Downtown Bethesda, so I don't have much to worry about anymore.

In Arlington's defense, I'd say the Wilson Boulevard/Clarendon Boulevard corridor is not without its charms, and Arlington in general is one of the most nicely racially integrated places I've ever been.
JM
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