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It often happens that new acquaintances upon hearing my name decide it should be pronounced "ar-MONDE" (accented heavily on the ... when I myself, my wife, or others make a point of pronouncing the name according to my preference in conversation.

Are these people who saw your name in writing before they heard it pronounced?

I know a woman named Diane, pronounced dee-ONN in the New Orleans French style. When she moved away from New Orleans no one would pronounce it her way, so eventually she changed the spelling to Dionne and after that everyone was happy.
Perhaps if your name were spelled Armand, like Armand Hammer, your problem would be lessened.

John Varela
(Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)
I apologize for munging the address but the spam was too much.
Isn't that the usual pronunciation of "McLean" as a surname ... it could be the name of a low-fat McDonald's hamburger.

The fact that there is (was?) a brand of toothpaste called MacClean's doesn't help.

Some years ago, I worked with two women called "Laurie McLean" who ran dance studios - one ballet, one jazz - both at the same address. One of them pronounced her name McLane, one Mcleen, but, believe me, it wasn't any help.
Fran
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
My first name is Armond. I pronounce my name "R-mund" (accent on the first syllable). I have been using this name for almost 62 years and I have grown used to its faults and virtues. I definitely cannot be argued out of my pronunciation preference.

It often happens that new acquaintances upon hearing my name decide it should be pronounced "ar-MONDE" (accented heavily on the second syllable) which I suppose sounds somewhat French. Many seem to insist upon it even when I myself, my wife, or others make a point of pronouncing the name
according to my preference in conversation.
I know there are many persons named Armond who pronounce their own name "are-MONDE," but as far as I'm concerned that's their business. I want what I want, and I want it now. I am looking for a few suggestions on how I can inform my new acquaintances in a polite fashion that they must obey my wishes. I suggest that there are broader applications for such techniques beyond addressing my obvious vanity.
R H Draney responded:
Mispronounce their names...address "Steve" with a short E, call "Brian" Brain, put the accent on the second syllable in "Dennis", add an extra O to "Bob"..
If that doesn't work, and it won't for everyone, just start making up wrong names for them...call "David" George, and "Kevin" Betty
John Varela added:
It needn't be that obvious. Add an extraneous syllable or three, as "Steverino", "Brian-o", "Bobolink"... Something that's not obviously intended to offend but that will grate on their nerves in short order.
Starting an acquaintanceship with incivility cannot be a good thing. The law of unintended consequences looks likely here ... they may start calling you ArMundoBobO.
I think that what is required is this: A new acquaintance must hear a correction every time without fail, and it must happen immediately, before the next phrase or even word. Best is if he also hears the correction out of his own mouth, meaning that you continue prompting until he says the name correctly, and do not let him get away with a "whatever" or a swallow and a nod. That is the hard part.

This takes practice to get the rhythm right. Try it first on completely new acquaintances. Also, since people learn names from the way other people in the group say them, it will probably work best in a new setting.
Once you get the practice grooved so that it is not an effort for you, it will be more effective and will probably only
take at most three iterations for each new acquaintance.

So, build up your strength by practicing with a few new acquaintances individually, then take on the next new yacht club as a group.

Those of us who like to get names right will actually appreciate this, since it is a slippery chore to change a name
once entered into the mind.
Richard Maurer To reply, remove half
Sunnyvale, California of a homonym of a synonym for also.
Don't forget Silver Spring(s), Maryland, part of the Greater Laurelplex. It's one test of DC area residency. McLean, ("mc'lain"), Virginia, is a second.

Isn't that the usual pronunciation of "McLean" as a surname (and it's not an uncommon Hiberno-Britic(TM) surname)?

Run "McLean" past your typical denizen of Flyover Country and listen for the result.
Granite, it also looks like it could be the name of a low-fat McDonald's hamburger.

A third is standing to the right on the Metro escalators,

They got that idear from New York.

What? New York has subway escalators? I don't recall ever seeing one. We've had them since the first Metro stations opened in 1976.

Liebs
Who used to subway to work
Isn't that the usual pronunciation of "McLean" as a surname (and it's not an uncommon Hiberno-Britic(TM) surname)?

Run "McLean" past your typical denizen of Flyover Country and listen for the result.

Fonzie might think of us as flyover country too, though, y'rhonor.
JM
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Run "McLean" past your typical denizen of Flyover Country and listen for the result.

Fonzie might think of us as flyover country too, though, y'rhonor.

Crazy talk! Greater Laurel is Coastal! It is part of the famous Bos-Wash Axis of Non-Evil! Now Chicago, that's flyover country, though Lt. Butch O'Hare International Airport is the site of many a layover.
Run "McLean" past your typical denizen of Flyover Country and listen for the result.

Fonzie might think of us as flyover country too, though, y'rhonor.

Crazy talk! Greater Laurel is Coastal! It is part of the famous Bos-Wash Axis of Non-Evil! Now Chicago, that's flyover country, though Lt. Butch O'Hare International Airport is the site of many a layover.
Run "McLean" past your typical denizen of Flyover Country and listen for the result.

Fonzie might think of us as flyover country too, though, y'rhonor.

Crazy talk! Greater Laurel is Coastal! It is part of the famous Bos-Wash Axis of Non-Evil! Now Chicago, that's flyover country, though Lt. Butch O'Hare International Airport is the site of many a layover.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Run "McLean" past your typical denizen of Flyover Country and listen for the result.

Fonzie might think of us as flyover country too, though, y'rhonor.

Crazy talk! Greater Laurel is Coastal! It is part of the famous Bos-Wash Axis of Non-Evil! Now Chicago, that's flyover country, though Lt. Butch O'Hare International Airport is the site of many a layover.
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