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David:
We're simply surprised to find them in lists of "words which have been overused in 2003", *since we have never seen them before reading the list.*

OY!!! Like I said, boo, naive and in a timewarp that makes Jan Brady and RuPaul look up-to-date.
Martin:
A (Usu. Z-) A large transparent ball containing an inner capsule

in which a person can be secured and then rolled along the ground, down hills, etc.

I never realized that thing had a name. I just called it a "roly ball". Boo?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
David:

We're simply surprised to find them in lists of "words ... *since we have never seen them before reading the list.*

OY!!! Like I said, boo, naive and in a timewarp that makes Jan Brady and RuPaul look up-to-date.

Out of curiousity, do you actually hear the word "in the wild"? I've seen lots of "Here's a new word going 'round" (approvingly, disapprovingly, or neutrally), but aside from that I've never actually heard the word used. It smacks of a word thought up by marketers in an attempt to get a group of people to self-identify as a new market segment that can be sold to.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >Code should be designed to make it
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >easy to get it right, not to workPalo Alto, CA 94304 >if you get it right.

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David: OY!!! Like I said, boo, naive and in a timewarp that makes Jan Brady and RuPaul look up-to-date.

Out of curiousity, do you actually hear the word "in the wild"? I've seen lots of "Here's a new word ... an attempt to get a group of people to self-identify as a new market segment that can be sold to.

I thought that this newsgroup was the first place I had encountered "metrosexual" until I saw a rerun of South Park tonight of an episode which I had seen before (although I had missed the beginning of it previously). It was from this season and dealt with all the men and boys of South Park (with the exception of Chef and Stan and the gay characters Mr. Garrison and Mr. Slave) going "metrosexual." The show's take on being metrosexual was to have heterosexual men acting stereotypically gay. It occurred to me after I watched the program that it is at least possible that by the time this program is shown in other countries "metrosexual" may have become a passé term!

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
<< (David) Well, it's not made it to the Warrington ... with the same level of formality? Or is that fop?[/nq]
Hello AUE, I have returned!! I simply had to post on this topic. As Joe would say, "You people are ... language. Rather than be met with opposition, they should be accepted. If you don't like the terms don't use them.

Has anyone in this group actually objected to the terms in question? Being unfamiliar with a word is not the same as objecting to it.

You have all sorts of people in this newsgroup. I, for example, enjoy South Park but never watch M-TV (not since *Beavis and Butt-Head* ended). Others no doubt watch neither South Park nor M-TV. Some of us listen to music on the radio, other don't and no doubt our tastes in music vary widely. Some are linguists of the polyglot variety, and some are linguists of the scientific variety. (Although, as I pointed out in another post in this thread, the "linguists" reference in the subject line is an error taken from an AP headline no linguists were involved in the original story.) Some members are even non-native speakers of English.
It's keen. :-)

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thus spake Raymond S. Wise:
You have all sorts of people in this newsgroup. I, for example, enjoy South Park but never watch M-TV (not since *Beavis and Butt-Head* ended). Others no doubt watch neither South Park nor M-TV.

Some of us don't even know how people who watch either can admit to it in a public forum.
Some of us listen to music on the radio, other don't and no doubt our tastes in music vary widely. Some ... taken from an AP headline no linguists were involved in the original story.) Some members are even non-native speakers of English.

Even? Oy!
It's keen. :-)

Wassat?

Simon R. Hughes
Has anyone in this group actually objected to the terms in question? Being unfamiliar with a word is not the same as objecting to it.

Is there room for a sub-set of the group that considers this type of word emergence as much ado about nothing? "Metrosexual" seems to be a coined word - if you count putting parts and pieces of words together with other parts and pieces as "coining" a word - but it's much like taking an extant word and giving it a new meaning. There are people who just like to do this.
Oenophiles seem to lead the pack in this. I have an otherwise bearable friend that has a fingernails-on-the-blackboard lexicon of wine terms. I swear he makes them up as he goes along.

He was over last weekend with a bottle of his latest find. He sat there dead-serious and asked me if I thought the wine was "too brittle". What the hell is a brittle wine?
I told him I didn't think it was too brittle, but that it left my teeth feeling a bit chalky. I made that up. It was just the first thing to say that popped into my mind. He just kind of nodded and ran his tongue over his teeth. Looking for chalkiness, I suppose. I'll bet he's over at someone else's house tonight telling them that the wine is "a nice little wine even if slightly brittle, but has just a hint of chalky remembrance".
I think next time he brings a bottle of wine over I'll tell him that it has a disturbing inertia to it. I think he'll like that phrase.
Even? Oy!

I thought it most appropriate to put it that way. The sentence occurs in the context of a discussion about popular culture. Understood was what I here present between bracketing double-asterisks: "Some members are even non-native speakers of English, **and so may know even less of popular culture than the rest of us.**" On reflection, however, I'll grant that some of those non-native speakers may very well know more of certain aspects of popular culture than the rest of us: M-TV, for one!
It's keen. :-)

Wassat?

Stuff and such.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I think next time he brings a bottle of wine over I'll tell him that it has a disturbing inertia to it. I think he'll like that phrase.

Hell, *I* like that phrase. Quite nicely describes AUE at times!

Dena Jo
Delete "delete.this.for.email" for email.
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