We're trying to hash this out in the Wikipedia article, .
It seems clear that dictionaries do include the word "milliard," do not identify it as obsolete, and of course define it to mean a thousand million. It seems clear that the word is used in other European languages.
However, I'm not so sure that dictionaries are reliable here. For example, all dictonaries include the names for the higher powers of a million/billion, even though numbers like sextillion, septillion, octillion, etc. are at best trivia curiosities (nobody who wishes to express numbers in those ranges does so by using these words).

So. Outside of dictionaries, tabular presentations of the names of numbers, or natural usage by non-English speakers when speaking English...
...is the word "milliard" really being used currently, in speech or writing, by a native English-speakers in English?
(Maybe I should say "used to represent the number one thousand million," since it's also a not-very-rare surname...)

Daniel P. B. Smith, dpbsmith at world dot ess tee dee dot com "Elinor Goulding Smith's Great Big Messy Book" is now back in print! Sample chapter at http://world.std.com/~dpbsmith/messy.html Buy it at /
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...is the word "milliard" really being used currently, in speech or writing, by a native English-speakers in English?

I can't say I use it, but I don't think I'd consider it ridiculously obscure if I came across it perhaps a bit precious, but not resolutely weird or archaic.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
We're trying to hash this out in the Wikipedia article, . It seems clear that dictionaries do include the ... "Elinor Goulding Smith's Great Big Messy Book" is now back in print! Sample chapter at http://world.std.com/~dpbsmith/messy.html Buy it at /

Has it not now been completely superceded by "billion"?

Steve Howarth
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
We're trying to hash this out in the Wikipedia article, . It seems clear that dictionaries do include the ... clear that the word is used in other European languages. However, I'm not so sure that dictionaries are reliable here.

They are too. The inclusion of a word's definition is no indication of how much the word is used.
For example, all dictonaries include the names for the higher powers of a million/billion, even though numbers like sextillion, septillion, octillion, etc. are at best trivia curiosities (nobody who wishes to express numbers in those ranges does so by using these words).

Nonsense.
So. Outside of dictionaries, tabular presentations of the names of numbers, or natural usage by non-English speakers when speaking English... ...is the word "milliard" really being used currently, in speech or writing, by a native English-speakers in English?

1. Yes, of course, if you mean by at least two people.
2. What's your opinion, from the googling you've done?

Adrian
We're trying to hash this out in the Wikipedia article, ... However, I'm not so sure that dictionaries are reliable here.

I wouldn't say the OED is totally so on this word. It says "milliard: n. Brit. one thousand million."
which implies to me it is still the common British term for a billion.
They are too. The inclusion of a word's definition is no indication of how much the word is used.

How "often", I think you mean. But it is an indication. Dictionaries don't include pet words that you or I might like or that we have invented for some occasion. If a word hasn't been used by a fair number, and I can't specify what that number is, of people, it is unlikely you will find it in a dictionary.
For example, all dictonaries include the names for the higher ... numbers in those ranges does so by using these words).

Nonsense.

You mistake a popular manner of speaking for an absolute statement of fact. Obviously, some people at least occasionally use these terms or they wouldn't be in dictionaries, but the occasions are relatively few. That is what the poster meant, as almost any native speaker of English would realize.
If I say, to give you another example, "Nobody puts whipped cream on a hot dog", that doesn't mean I'm excluding the possibility that some yahoo does.

Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
...is the word "milliard" really being used currently, in speech or writing, by a native English-speakers in English? (Maybe I should say "used to represent the number one thousand million," since it's also a not-very-rare surname...)

It is current in European community documents,
Jan
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
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Nonsense.

You mistake a popular manner of speaking for an absolute statement of fact. Obviously, some people at least occasionally use ... the occasions are relatively few. That is what the poster meant, as almost any native speaker of English would realize.

"At best trivia curiosities" strikes me as a lot more specific than a colloquial exaggerattion like "nobody uses such words".

I certainly took the poster to be implying in all literalness that these words are linguistic oddities which survive solely in terms of trivial knowledge. And Adrian's "nonsense" response to that view was dead right.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
Steve Howarth filted:
Has it not now been completely superceded by "billion"?

Hard to say...has "superseded" been superseded by "superceded"?...

(Sorry...it's just that it's one of my favorite "most misspelled words")..r
We're trying to hash this out in the Wikipedia article, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billion . It seems clear that dictionaries do include the ... course define it to mean a thousand million. It seems clear that the word is used in other European languages.

Well, for a start it is the French for billion (1,000,000,000) and therefore familiar to Europeans who read about EU budgets, taxes, etc.
We could offer crores or lakhs of reasons why usage should be left to whatever local people find convenient.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
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