+0

Dear all,

I am having trouble identifying the misplaced modifier in the following phrase:

Ever experiment almost failed; nearly 90 percent failed.

This is an example of a question I have to answer for a copy-editing class I am taking and it does not appear to be a typographical error, in spite of all my doubts.

Can anyone help me?

+0
olive paint 855Ever experiment

Are you sure that's not "Every experiment"?

CJ

Comments  
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.

As I said in the forum post, in spite of my doubts, I don't think it is a typo.

It makes the most sense that it would be "every experiment" but for whatever reason, I received the question exactly the way it is written above. I know it's confusing, sorry.

olive paint 855

As I said in the forum post, in spite of my doubts, I don't think it is a typo.

It makes the most sense that it would be "every experiment" but for whatever reason, I received the question exactly the way it is written above. I know it's confusing, sorry.

OK. In that case it's time to complain to the person who gave you the question because I think this is what they want:

Almost every experiment failed; nearly 90 percent failed.

CJ

My sentiments exactly.

I really cannot think of any context in which the original question makes sense, even if it's a phrase from Elizabethan English or some other such historical context. I think I'd better have a word with my teacher and hope that she answers in time.

Thank you for your help, CJ!

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
olive paint 855have a word with my teacher

Good idea. Why didn't I think of that? Emotion: wink

Good luck.

CJ