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Good evening.

Is it true that you say hello to a female teacher by saying 'Good morning, miss' even though she is a Mrs?

Thank you.

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In the US, maybe 60 years ago it was common. I do not think it is used anymore.

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slocawber

Good evening.

Is it true that you say hello to a female teacher by saying 'Good morning, miss' even though she is a Mrs?

Thank you.

I think this is a matter of local custom.

Where I grew up we never used that term of address. We said either "Good morning" without any name, or (much more often) "Good morning, Mrs. [surname]", including the surname.

I have heard that in some regions it's typical to address any woman you know fairly well as "Miss" plus her first name, i.e., Miss Ellen, Miss Margaret, etc., in any situation. I don't know how widespread that practice is.

CJ

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So: would 'Good morning Mrs' sound more natural today? Or would you say 'Mrs' followed by the surname? Thank you.

It varies, but I can't imagine a teacher would be so petty as to object to a polite nothing like "Miss". If she doesn't like it, she can tell you. If you are unsure, ask her how she would like to be addressed.

In the US Northeast, we tend to call a strange young woman "Miss". In the South, where I lived for a while, they call her "Ma'am". The idea is that in the North, they think it is politer to pretend that the woman is too young to be married. Down South, they think it is a compliment to her to imply that no woman so attractive could possibly not have been taken already.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
slocawberOr would you say 'Mrs' followed by the surname?

Yes.

When I was a child, we called all male teachers sir.

I never had any female teachers.

Clive

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