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This is how I understand it:

Normal verbs use the present perfect continuous, not the present perfect.

Non-continuous verbs use the present perfect, not the present perfect continuous.

Mixed verbs use one or the other, depending on whether the one is a normal or non-continuous verb.

1) Is the verb to become a normal, non-continuous, or mixed verb?

2) What is 'become' here? It seems that it can use either tense/aspect, meaning the verb is mixed, I assume.

Learning to overcome these obstacles has become/has been becoming less challenging over the years.

Thank you.
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'Normal verbs use the present perfect continuous, not the present perfect.'-- Whatever do you mean by this? Most verbs use both.
http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/presentperfect.html

http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/presentperfectcontinuous.html

"It is important to remember that Non-Continuous Verbs cannot be used in any continuous tenses. Also, certain non-continuous meanings for Mixed Verbs cannot be used in continuous tenses. Instead of using Present Perfect Continuous with these verbs, you must use Present Perfect."
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I don't want to wade through all that. I asked you about 'normal verbs' that can't use present perfect-- a puzzling statement.
I apologize. That statement is wrong. I don't know how I made that mistake.

Could you answer my question re: because please?
All I can say about that is that 'be + becoming' is awkward but in occasional use. I think most style manuals (if they address it) would urge revision.

Does that help?
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Mister Micawber
Does that help?


Thanks, I think I have it: It is a mixed verb, but generally used as a non-continuous verb, thus requiring the present perfect on most occasions. Correct?
Sounds reasonable, offhand.
English 1b3Normal verbs use the present perfect continuous, not the present perfect.
No. They use both, as I see you recognize from a later post.
But the point is not so much whether a verb is in the simple or the continuous, but what it means when it is simple and what it means when it is continuous. The two basic meanings that seem to be of concern are what we might call the "eventive" and the "stative/habitual" meanings.
English 1b32) What is 'become' here? It seems that it can use either tense/aspect, meaning the verb is mixed, I assume.

Learning to overcome these obstacles has become/has been becoming less challenging over the years.
Below is a summary of some of what I think that site is telling us about the use of the two present perfect tenses (simple and continuous).

Discrete event(s) Continuously happening

in the indefinite past over a period of time until the present
"Eventive" "Stative/Habitual"

Normal: simple continuous / simple
Non-contin: [not used] simple

Mixed: Verbs that follow one of the patterns above when they have one meaning, and follow the other pattern when they have another meaning.

___________________

Examples:

Normal:

I have danced the waltz. I have been dancing the waltz for many years.

I have danced the waltz for many years.
Katy has found agates Katy has been finding agates on this beach for many years.

on this beach. Katy has found agates on this beach for many years.

Non-continuous:

--- I have known Paul for many years.
--- He has owned that house for many years.

Mixed:

I have lived in London. I have been living in London for many years.
(but I don't live there now) (and still live in London)

I have lived in London for many years.
Learning has become easy. Learning has been becoming easy over the years.
Learning has become easy over the years.

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I don't see a difference between "normal" and "mixed", so I'd say that become, as you illustrate it above, could be considered either "normal" or "mixed". Maybe I don't understand the categories on that site.

CJ
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