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Hi,
Is this OK to have an adjective and a noun after what looks to be prepositional phrase. I think it is OK to have either a noun or an adjective, but two of them at the same time?

... by refusing to judge anything according to right or law.

Sorry, but I have another question: What does it mean by "across" here? I think you can go across a big land but this?

... go across some of the Coorong barrages.
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... by refusing to judge anything according to right or law.-- This is fine.

... go across some of the Coorong barrages. -- I presume that you can walk across them like walking across a bridge, when they are above the waterline.

(BARRAGE—An artificial obstruction, such as a dam or an irrigation channel, built in a watercourse to increase its depth or to divert its flow either for navigation or irrigation. )
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Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thank you.
You wrote:

... by refusing to judge anything according to right or law.-- This is fine.

Do you consider this accpetable -- having both an adjective and noun after a prepositional phrase, which (I think) can accommdate both?

... by refusing to judge anything according to bad/good or law.
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Right is a noun here: 'anything in accord with principles of justice''.
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