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Hi from Türkiye,

Modals : Can, Could, May, Might, Should, Ought to, Must, Would, Will, Shall

Semi-modals : Dare, Need, Have to, Used to

Others : Had Better, be Supposed to, be Used to, be Accustomed to etc.

Why we call semi-modals and others instead of saying all of them modal??????(It was taken from a grammar book)
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Hi redliddy

I am not so sure what to say about your 'Others' group but the difference between 'Modals' and 'Semi-modals' is very clear. I have always called 'modals' defective auxiliaries, by the way, but I do know that your term is also used.

With the modals you never use do in questions and negations:
I can't swim. (Not: I don't can swim.)
Should I go there? (Not: Do I should go here?)

With the semi-modals you have a choice, at least many grammarians think so:
Dare he do it? Or: Does he dare to do it?
I need not go there. Or: I don't need to go there.
He used to like it. Or: He didn't use to like it.
(Quite a few people consider even He didn't used to like it correct.)

However, most usage experts (if there are any Emotion: smile) would want you to sayI don't have to do it, and would think I haven't to do it wrong.

But even have can be made negative without do when it is the auxiliary of the perfect tense: I haven't seen him. So that may be the reason some people call it a semi-modal. And you can say:
I haven't a cat. Or: I don't have a cat.

Cheers
CB
Comments  
Others : Had Better, be Supposed to, be Used to, be Accustomed to etc.

others = modal idioms

"Why we call semi-modals and others instead of saying all of them modal"

because they are intermediate between auxiliaries and main verbs.

I daren't jump -- You mustn't jump

I do not dare jump -- You do not must jump