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Hi,

Please tell me if these sound strange or need more explanation or perhaps are correct as they are.

1. I go to a high school in Tokyo. I went to two different high schools before that.
2. My love is the/his swimming.

Most of times, I hear people say, "I go to school," but can I say "I go to a school"?
I have seen such structures as "I love to watch his cooking of vegetable soup." Does it sound OK when a gerund has an article or possessive in front of it?
Comments  
Hi,
Please tell me if these sound strange or need more explanation or perhaps are correct as they are.

1. I go to a high school in Tokyo. I went to two different high schools before that. Fine. Wltth the article, you are talking about places. Without it, you are talking more about your level of education.

2. My love is the/his swimming.Sounds odd. Why not just say 'I love his swimming' or 'I love to watch him swim'?
Or perhaps you mean 'I love swimming' or 'I love to swim

Most of times, I hear people say, "I go to school," but can I say "I go to a school"? Again, yes, if you want to think of the school as a building, as a place.
I have seen such structures as "I love to watch his cooking of vegetable soup." Does it sound OK when a gerund has an article or possessive in front of it? It's correct, but it sounds somewhat formal. Less formal and very common is 'I love to watch him cooking vegetable soup'.

Best wishes, Clive
I think they're all okay as they are, except, "My love is the swimming." Without context, we'd say, "I love swimming." But you could say, Every summer we vacation at a beach resort which offers tennis, horseback riding, and swimming. My love is the swimming. That is, you've established something for the definite article to refer back to.

Similarly, "I go to a high school in Tokyo," is fine, but "I go to a high school" doesn't work without context. (But it's grammatical.) "I go to high school" is what you do. "I go to a high school" is where you go. It might work as a stand-alone sentence with some previous context: I hear you're studying programming.? Where are you taking your courses? - On the internet? (reply) I go to a high school.

- A.
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Thank you, all.

My sentence:

I went to two different high schools before that.

Do the words 'two' and 'different', either together or as separate words, make the words 'high school' to mean a place, rather than a level of learning?
You shouldn''t mean a place or a level of learning with the sentence above. You should write like this: For three years, I have been going three different highschools in the same city. In every school,I had followed a different level When I attended the third school,....
AnonymousDo the words 'two' and 'different', either together or as separate words, make the words 'high school' to mean a place, rather than a level of learning?
I suppose you could look at it that way. But even without those words, I would take high school in I went to high school as a place.
CJ
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Hi,
Yet in a job interview, for example, the interviewer who asks 'Did you go to high school' is not asking about a place, but rather about your level of education.

Best wishes, Clive
Interesting point, Clive.

What about if the interviewer asks, "Where did you go to high school?"
Still a level of education, or a place, or ambiguous between the two?
CJ
Hi CJ,
I'd take 'where' to refer to 'place' and 'high school' to refer to the level of education.

Clive
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