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A professor talks to a student at college and in the end he says: "I'm glad you're getting your money's worth on education here."
What does he mean?
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It's hard to tell without more context. Does the student have to repeat a class? Does he use up a lot of the professor's time?

When you get your money's worth, it means you are getting a lot of use for whatever you paid for something. (I figure when it takes me 100 strokes to get around 9 holes of golf while my companion does it in only 50, I've gotten a much better price per stroke than she has - I've gotten my money's worth.)
You have to ask what the professor does differently than the other professors where the student's do not get their money's worth. Or perhaps its the students who do something differently. Perhaps they are very "pro-active" and make the professor work extra hard answering difficult questions. Maybe they make him work overtime. We really don't know from what you've told us.

Edit. Sorry, I misread. We're talking about one student here. So perhaps the student is getting more than his share of the professor's attention. "Money's worth" is often used figuratively. Who knows? Students who don't apply themselves to their studies (or just party) clearly don't get their money's worth.
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Well the student mistaked the word misanthrope by saying disanthrope.
Madhulk Well the student mistaked the word misanthrope by saying disanthrope.
That was probably meant as a joke. Is this supposed to be a humorous piece?
It was sarcastic. Was it Ghost Whisperer? I just heard it recently myself.

The student is sort-of learning - he now knows that there is a word "misanthrope" but he doesn't really have the word down.
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Grammar GeekIt was sarcastic. Was it Ghost Whisperer? I just heard it recently myself.

The student is sort-of learning - he now knows that there is a word "misanthrope" but he doesn't really have the word down.
Yep, same one.
What about when Melinda says to Justin she's not keeping score?
"I need you to believe I wanna help you.
-Why should you? I haven't helped you very much.
-I'm not keeping score.It's just what I do." Does she mean that she just wants to help him like a friend and not because she feels she owes him?
Madhulk Well the student mistaked the word misanthrope by saying disanthrope.
It should be mistook.
She's not keeping score = she not making a record of the number of good things or bad things that either had done to make sure they are even.

That one was a bit sad, I thought, until the very end. I hope the professor takes good care of the gerbil!
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