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Which one is (more) right, t.e. what's the difference if there is any?

Thanks and rgds.

Eva
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We are going to vacation in Hawaii in six months. Six months from now we will leave for Hawaii.
We are going to vacation in Hawaii within six months. At some time between now and six months from now we will leave for Hawaii. Before six months have passed we will leave for Hawaii.

The credit card company will notify us of our status in six months. Six months from now we will be notified.
The credit card company will notify us of our status within six months. At some time between now and six months from now we will be notified. Before six months have passed we will be notified.

He finished writing the book in six months. It took him six months of work to finish the book. He started writing; six months passed; he was finished.
He finished writing the book within six months. It took him less than six months of work to finish the book. He started writing; before six months passed, he was finished.

CJ
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Hi CalifJim,

So, 'in six months' is equivalent to 'after six months from now'. Right?
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Comments  
No. Let's say today is October 1. "in six months" is April 1. "after six months" is after April 1 - from that April 1 to eternity. January 25, 2372 is "after six months", but not "in six months".
CJ
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Got it , CalifJim.