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Mexican kings, when they mounted the throne, swore that they would make the sun to shine, the clouds to give rain, the rivers to flow, and the earth to bring forth fruits in abundance."

This a sentence taken from "The Golden Bough", by sir James Frazier. The use of the complete infinitive after the verb make surprised me, being used to hearing: "make the sun shine..."

What about the grammar correctness of this usage?

Thanks.
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Both 'make' and 'make....to' sound fine to me. "Cause" would require 'to', however.
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The complete infinitive is not used anymore in that situation, as far as I know. It sounds very old-fashioned and formal to my ear.
CJ
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Comments  
CalifJimThe complete infinitive is not used anymore in that situation, as far as I know. It sounds
very old-fashioned and formal
to my ear.

CJ
Would you allow 'poetic' or 'lyrical' to be added to the description? I love it! [I believe that James Weldon Johnson used that construction in his "Creation" from God's Trombones.]
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PhilipWould you allow 'poetic' or 'lyrical' to be added to the description? I love it!
Sure. Why not? You make me to laugh, Philip! Emotion: smile
CJ
Old-fashioned but correct, then.

Thank you, guys!