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This case is no more big than that one.

Someone says the above sentence is right.

If it's right, how different is it from "This case is no bigger than that one." and "This case is the same size as that one."

Thanks
LiJ
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Nona, why are you including three components when the example only had two? A is no bigger than B. It may not be the BEST way to say it in all cases, but it's not WRONG. If I were handed a project that I didn't think I could handle, my boss would probably say: Kristy, why are you stressing? This project is no bigger than the last one I gave you.Why is that wrong?

I only had the third component to replace 'big/bigger' to make it a general example. There is nothing wrong with phrasing it the way you say here - that is the normal standard everyday way to do so. That wasn't the question though. The question was whether 'X is no more big than Y' could be correct as other native speakers have said. I was confirming that, yes, there are contexts where that is perfectly correct - but not when you are just doing a standard comparison.
But can you disparage a case?

No, but you are disparaging the person who has claimed that the case is a big one.
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As that 'someone' I am a native speaker and yes, anon, if you read through this thread, you will see that I say 'bigger' should be used for usual comparisons.

The sentences do NOT mean the same thing at all.

'this is no more X than that' is perfectly correct as an emphatic, somewhat derisory/disparaging way to point out that two things are really the same in NOT being even slightly X.
oooer I keep trying to reply and my posts are turning up in the middle of the thread!

Anyway, honestly, if it was a simple comparison then 'bigger' would be correct.

But the structure 'X is no more big than Y" IS correct in some contexts - where we are firmly and emphatically stating that neither are big and that whoever is claiming X is big is being rather stupid! (essentially).
With all due respect, I see this differently.
>>>>>I don't think you got my point.
When A is bigger than B, then of course 'bigger'.
When A and B are the same, and neither of them is big, then 'no more big than'. I respectfully disagree! This sounds like finger nails on the chalkboard to me. In my opinion, when it comes to sizes, we must use the right form of adjective(s). It’s still “no bigger than…”
Hard to find an example to explain really
It's often used in a disparaging way to disprove something.
For example
'That women is no more an actress than I am!" (I am not am actress and neither is she, although it seems clear that 'she' or someone is trying to claim that 'she' is). I’ll buy that!
"That is no more a diamond than this lump of coal!"
This case is no more big than that one. - Neither of the cases is big at all.>>>>
This jacket is no more windproved than the one I ‘ve just tried on. Fine
This jacket is no more warm than the one I ‘ve just tried on. Not good!
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nona the britoooer I keep trying to reply and my posts are turning up in the middle of the thread!

Anyway, honestly, if it was a simple comparison then 'bigger' would be correct.

But the structure 'X is no more big than Y" IS correct in some contexts - where we are firmly and emphatically stating that neither are big and that whoever is claiming X is big is being rather stupid! (essentially).
I agree with you completely, Nona. Emotion: smile
Here's my try at an example of the usage (with a one-syllable adjective, as in the original question):
A: Hey! Did you hear that John was dead?
B: What?! When did this supposedly happen? I just saw John half an hour ago and he was no more dead than you!

The "no more X than Y" usage is not nearly as common as a simple comparison, but it is nonetheless possible and in use in the right sort of context.
In my example above, B could also say this:
I just saw John half an hour ago and he was not any more dead than you!
Neither of these two wordings sound necessarily disparaging to me, but they do suggest a refusal or inability to accept or agree with what A has just said about John. B is suggesting that neither John nor "you" is dead.

.
Nona, Yankee,
I think the original point was whether more big (and by extension, certain other combinations like more good, more bad) is correct in any circumstance.
The two of you seem to think that in more complex structures it's fine, even when you seem to say that it's not all right in simpler ones.
In other words I hear you saying that in your view(s):
I'm feeling more well than he is is wrong (It should be better, not more well.), but I am feeling no more well than he is is fine; it need not be rendered as I am feeling no better than he is.
This box is more big than that one is wrong (It should be bigger, not more big), but This box is no more big than that one is fine; it need not be rendered as This box is no bigger than that one.

Mary is in more bad shape than Susan is wrong (It should be worse, not more bad), but Mary is in no more bad shape than Susan is fine; it need not be rendered as Mary is in no worse shape than Susan.

To make things worse, (or to make them more bad, if you insist Emotion: smile), somewhere in the thread an example with a noun (no more an actress) is introduced, and the orginal question about the comparison of adjectives gets lost in the shuffle. And the example with dead seems to me to be beside the point since there is no word deader. (Edit: leaving aside Goodman's doornail example!)

Let me know if I have in some way misrepresented your views or if you think I have misunderstood the original question at the top of the thread.

Jim
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