+0

hey ...

you're hair is more nice than hers ?

OR

you hair is nicer than hers ?

which is grammatically correct ? Please help me out !!!

+0
paint red 710

Your hair is more nice than hers.

OR

Your hair is nicer than hers.

Which is grammatically correct? Please help me out. !!!

They are now both grammatically correct, but only the second is natural.

1 2
Comments  
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I think Australia's beaches are most nice than Europe's beaches.
anonymous I think Australia's beaches are most nice nicer than Europe's beaches.

As shown.

CJ

I have always know that "nicer" is not allowed. It's not grammatically correct.

Maybe in these 30 years the rules have been changed...?

Our teacher in Czech Republic (she was really a good one) taught us that nicer is not to be said. No way.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
anonymous

I have always know that "nicer" is not allowed. It's not grammatically correct.

Maybe in these 30 years the rules have been changed...?

Our teacher in Czech Republic (she was really a good one) taught us that nicer is not to be said. No way.

No, sorry, she was mistaken. Nicer is correct, and has been the preferred form for centuries. You may come across more nice, but it's much less common, and sounds odd.

In English, there are two kinds of adjectives:

1-Short adjectives: In comparison between two things, we just need to add "er" at the end of the adjective.

Ex:

nice-nicer

tall-taller

short-shorter

big-bigger


2- Long adjectives: when we want to make a comparison between two things, we just need to add the word "more" before the adjective.

Ex:

Beautiful - More beautiful

Wonderful - More wonderful

Different - More different


Based on that rule, in English tests, choose "nicer" especially with multiple choice questions. Otherwise, they will consider it wrong.

(Edited by moderator to remove typos)

Nicer

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

Comparative of superiority for adjectives with

a) one syllable - Adjective + _er

fat-fatter, big-bigger, thin-thinner, old-older, young-younger


b) three or more syllable - More + adjective

more sociable, more intelligent, more polite


c) two syllables... It depends:

adjective ending in Y - 1st option (_er) - happy-happier, lazy-lazier, pretty-prettier

adjective NOT ending in y - 2nd option (more) - more famous, more able, more solid


As for nice... By this rule of grammar, we should say "more nice than...". But actually, almost everybody says "Nicer than" (although it is against this rule). What should I say to my students about this? (and to myself-...) Emotion: wink

Show more