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Hello teachers,

Which of the two is correct?

more than one passenger

or

more than one passengers

If you could also explain why. Many thanks in advance!
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Anonymousmore than one passenger
According to the American Heritage Dictionary of English Usage:

When a noun phrase contains more than one and a singular noun, the verb is normally singular: There is more than one way to skin a cat. More than one editor is working on that project. More than one field has been planted with oats. When more than one is followed by of and a plural noun, the verb is plural: More than one of the paintings were stolen. More than one of the cottages are for sale. When more than one stands alone, it usually takes a singular verb, but it may take a plural verb if the notion of multiplicity predominates: The operating rooms are all in good order. More than one is (or are) equipped with the latest imaging technology.
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Anonymousmore than one passenger
This one. You wouldn't say 'one passengers'.
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Mister Micawber,

Thank you so much for the prompt and very good reply. Now I've a reference when someone ask me a similar if not the same question. By the way, is the verb in the bold clause correct? Emotion: smile
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Anonymous. By the way, is the verb in the bold clause correct?
No, sorry— 'someone' is singular.
I see. Thanks, Mister Micawber. You're of so much help.
More than one passenger is correct because one qualify the passenger.
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Both are correct if we use more than one with singular noun we use singular verb and if we use plural noun then we use plural verb
anonymousif we use more than one with singular noun we use singular verb and if we use plural noun then we use plural verb

But "more than one" is always followed by a singular noun, so there is no need whatsoever to mention what to do if it's plural.

Just say

"more than one (something)" is always followed by a singular verb.

Example: More than one student has asked me this question.

CJ

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