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Hi
I already asked about this, but apparently I didn't understand very well. Sorry...

Moderators are not that good here. I think we need moderators that are more skilled.

The above sentence is ok. What would native speakers naturally say to convey the same meaning?

Moderators are not that good here. I think we need more skilled moderators.
Moderators are not that good here. I think we need moderators more skilled.
Other...

Consider those sentences as spoken sentences, not written, so stress and intonation can be taken into account.
Thanks Emotion: smile
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Comments  
You can do a lot with intonation to make sure your sentence is clear, Kooyeen.

Of course, one way to make sure that people don't understand "additional skilled moderators" rather than moderators who are "more skilled" (skilleder? Emotion: stick out tongue) is to say or write it just that way: "moderators who are more skilled".

In spoken English, you might hear a definite separation or pause between 'more' and 'skilled moderators', along with some emphasis on 'more':

We need more ... skilled moderators.

Moderators are not that good here. I think we need moderators with better skills.
Moderators are not that good here. I think we need experienced moderators with skills.

Moderators are not that good here. I think we need more experienced and skilled moderators
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The moderators here aren't so good; I think we need more skilled ones.
Thanks, thanks, thanks.

No one commented on my sentences though... Let's say I want to find a natural alternative way to say (and not write) this:

Moderators are not that good here. I think we need moderators that are more skilled.

Would these ones be among the possible natural ways?
Moderators are not that good here. I think we need more skilled moderators. (the main stress is on "skilled")
Moderators are not that good here. I think we need moderators more skilled.
(the main stress is on "skilled")

And if you say the first but change the stress...
Moderators are not that good here. I think we need more skilled moderators. (if you put the main stress on "moderators", the meaning changes and you get "I think we need more moderators that are skilled")

What's your opinion? Thanx Emotion: smile
Hi Koyeen,

I think your sentences are a bit long-winded to be considered everyday informal speach which is why I posted the response above.
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"New mods. Good mods. That's what we need."

MrP
Thank you again.

But I still have the same doubts as before... I'll try to ask in a more general way then:

I don't know where to place the part of a comparative, do I put it before or after the noun? Those parts might be something like "even more skilled", "much rarer", "better", etc.

It's a much rarer achievement.
It's an achievement much rarer.
It's a much rarer achievement than the other.
It's an achievement much rarer than the other.
It's a better achievement.
It's an achievement better.
It's a better achievement than the other.
It's an achievement better than the other.
and so on...

I hope you understand what the more general problem is. I suspect my question has no answer, but you'd better have an answer because I just thought of a way to solve all the difficult questions we learners ask and that are difficult to explain... Emotion: wink LOL Maybe I'll tell you later.
Hi Kooyeen

Where I wrote OK, the sentence sounds normal/natural to me. Where I commented, I wrote what I think is a possible usage/interpretation:

It's a much rarer achievement.
-- OK
It's an achievement much rarer. -- It's rarer by one achievement. (i.e. one achievement less) -OR- ellipsis
It's a much rarer achievement than the other. -- OK
It's an achievement much rarer than the other. -- OK
It's a better achievement. -- OK
It's an achievement better. -- It's better by one achievement. (i.e. one achievement more)
It's a better achievement than the other. -- OK
It's an achievement better than the other. -- OK (ellipsis: 'that is' has been omitted after 'achievement')
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