+0
Would you please tell me the differences between the two phrases?

1) His weight problem has become MORE OF a struggle to him.

2) His weight problem has become SOMETHING OF a struggle to him.

And why can't we just say, "His weight problem has become a struggle to him?"

Thankds in advance.
Comments  
my speculation:

(1)His weight problem has become MORE OF a struggle to him.

more like a strggle than a problem .

2) His weight problem has become SOMETHING OF a struggle to him

it's a problem that seems a little like a struggle in some repect

The problem is the first sentence is bigger than the one in the second sentence
Is this what you mean?

more of = more like

something of = sort of

Glee
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Do you mean:

something of = sort of

more of = more like?
Yes,I think so.
Glee, the sentences above all mean pretty much the same thing...but there is a subtle difference. Let's say the person's name is Thomas.

1) more of:
In this case, the weight problem had been a struggle to Thomas all along. He probably tried dieting, exercising, etc. but didn't have much success. Then, let's say one day he stopped smoking. So the problem got magnified. Then you could say 'Thomas's weight problem became more of a struggle after he quit smoking."

2) something of:
In this case, Thomas never had a very serious struggle with his weight before, but something happened so that now he is. Ex: Since Thomas turned 40, his metabolism slowed down and now his weight problem has become something of a struggle to him.

In either case, you could just say 'Thomas's weight problem has become a struggle to him' but then it's not quite as descriptive or elegant.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Delayed thanks for Hly2004's and Danyoo's help.

This forum has become something of a Bible to me.
[H][Y]