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I ran into more terms that puzzled me:

1. The Normans introduced castles with the classic plan of a "motte and bailey" (what is motte and bailey?)

2. What is the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle?

Thanks again!
Comments  
Hi,
1. The Normans introduced castles with the classic plan of a "motte and bailey" (what is motte and bailey?)

This kind of early castle was easy to make. It had two basic parts. The motte, a mound of earth with a wooden tower on top of it, and the bailey, a larger area like a primitive courtyard, both surrounded by a fence. Around both the motte and the bailey the builders would usually dig a defensive ditch.

2. What is the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle?
It is a series of manuscripts written by monks in Anglo-Saxon, roughly from 900 to 1250.
It is an important source of information about those times.

You can get a lot more detail if you search online for these terms.

Good luck!
Clive
Thank you, Clive!
One more question: is the ditch inside or outside the fence?
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Hi,
I'm sure it would be outside, to 'protect' the fence.
Clive
Thanks again!
Hi JulieLai once more,
The original castle information I gave you was from the Internet. I've been thinking about it, and had another thought I want to pass on to you. You asked about the ditch. In the castle design of a later period, the 'moat'' was the ditch around a castle that was filled with water. I would guess that this word 'moat' derives from the word 'motte', probably because the original 'motte' was built with earth from the ditch.
Castle design is an interesting subject, and I'm sure there is a lot of good information available. If I can be of any more help, please let me know.
Clive
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Thanks again for your help.
I tried to google for a picture but couldn't find any that fits the bill.

I guess the castles in "Lord of the Rings" aren't motte and bailey then?
Hi,
No,they're not. Gondor was a fantasy city, and Helm's Deep a huge fortress. They were both built against mountains, as I recall. That seemed unlikely to me, since the enemy could just go up to the top of the mountain and drop rocks on them.
Eomer's palace, where the Rohirrim lived on top of a hillside, seemed a bit more realistic to me, in size and location and general appearance.

Tolkien, of course, knew all this and much more, as he was a considerable scholar.
Clive
Thanks, Clive!
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