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I've learned that conjunstions such as "more than" connect 2 clauses (by definition, a clause consists of at least 2 elements: a subject and a verb) into one. For example:

He spends more than he earns

But in the following sentence, I couldn't not identify 2 but one clause:

".....but they more than made up for it by finding profound depth of meaning in the subtle internal detail and symbolic suggestion."

Could someone be kind enought to shed some light? Thanks a million.

Raen
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"they more than made up for it" -- they used someting, spent something, did something wrong - it's hard to say what. Then something good happened, and the final result was positive. It was more positive than the original thing that was negative.

I spent $10 for my ticket to dig in the diamond mine, but the 5-carat diamond I found more than made up for that $10.

You really hurt my feelings when you forgot my birthday, but you more than made up for it by taking me out to this lovely dinner.
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Hi,

I've learned that conjunstions such as "more than" connect 2 clauses (by definition, a clause consists of at least 2 elements: a subject and a verb) into one. For example:

He spends more than he earns

The above is just one of several ways of using the phrase, not the only way. eg Consider 'Tom has more than 6 children', which consists of only one clause.

But in the following sentence, I couldn't not identify 2 but one clause:

"..but they more than made up for it by finding profound depth of meaning in the subtle internal detail and symbolic suggestion." Here, 'more than' is just an adverbial phrase, modifying 'made up'. You could just remove it completely and stil have a viable sentence.

Best wishes, Clive