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This question is from the Official SAT Guide Book page 724 #18

The survey [showed that] most shoppers who drive prefer the mall [more than] downtown stores [simply because] finding parking is [less difficult] at the mall. [no error]

Why is more than wrong? Isn't it used to compare that parking is easier to find at the mall than downtown stores? Can you please explain about 'more than' I don't really get when to use it correctly, and I can't distinguish when it shouldn't be used.

Thanks in advance!
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Hi,

Welcome to the Forum.

This question is from the Official SAT Guide Book page 724 #18

The survey [showed that] most shoppers who drive prefer the mall [more than] downtown stores [simply because] finding parking is [less difficult] at the mall. [no error]

If you post more of these test questions, please include the answer that your book offers. It will make it easier for us to comment further.

Why is more than wrong? Isn't it used to compare that parking is easier to find at the mall than downtown stores? Can you please explain about 'more than' I don't really get when to use it correctly, and I can't distinguish when it shouldn't be used.

Consider 'I like Coke more than Pepsi'. This means you like both, but the degree of liking is greater for Coke.

When you deal with two things, you can only prefer one. You can't prefer both Coke and Pepsi. So, you can't say 'I prefer Coke more'.

The standard grammar form is 'I prefer Coke to Pepsi'.

Best wishes, Clive
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I agree with Clive, but I only noticed it after I read his post.
"Prefer something more than something else" didn't sound wrong to me, and I suspect it is a native kind of English and not really a mistake. I guess natives say it that way too, don't they? Hmm
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Comments  
Hi,
Try telling the SAT people it's not an error.

Clive
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To prefer is to like more than, so prefer the mall more than downtown stores means
(like the mall more than something)
more than
(like downtown stores more than something (else)).
Or something like that! Emotion: smile
As Clive says, prefer X to Y is the pattern.
CJ
theooo prefer the mall [more than] downtown stores
prefer the mall [rather than] downtown stores