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Teachers

This time I'd like to ask something about sentences for comparison. Please look the two sentences below.
(1) George has saved as much as money Bill has already saved.
(2) George has saved more money than Bill has already saved.
My English grammar book (written in Japanese) says #1 is OK but #2 is wrong. Is it true? And if so, what is the reason?

paco
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In my opinion, they are equally correct, which in this case means equally awkward. The "already" in either sentence is really unnecessary.

CJ
Comments  
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CJ

Thank you for the comment. Yes 'always' could be redundant in those sentences. OK I'll change them a bit.

(1) In a month George will save more money than Bill has always saved.
(2) In a month George will save as much money as Bill has always saved.

Do both still sound OK to you?

What my grammar book says is that 'always' belongs to 'positive polarity items' and a positive polarity item is not well used in the 'than clause' of comparison structures. I myself doubt if it is true, though.

paco
Here I have to say that neither appeals to me! "ever" is probably the better choice.

George saves more Emotion: money in a month than Bill has ever saved.
George can save more Emotion: money in a month than Bill has ever saved.
George can save more Emotion: money in a month than Bill could ever save in a month.
George will save more Emotion: money this month than Bill has ever saved.
In a month George will have saved more Emotion: money than Bill has ever saved.

"as much" can substitute for "more" in all of these.

Calif Jim
CJ

Thank you for the comment. I think I'd better throw my grammar book into a trash box.

paco
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