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Is there any difference between "on the morning" and "in the morning"?
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Hi,

Is there any difference between "on the morning" and "in the morning"? The latter is much more common than the former. Here are some general comments.

"on the morning" You are thinking of the morning as a point in time. You need to identify when that morning is, what that point in time is. eg

He called me on the morning of July 17th.

I'll call him on Tuesday morning.

"in the morning" You are thinking of the morning as a period, during which things may happen. You don't have to specify when that morning is. eg

I read the newpaper in the morning.

I'll call you in the morning.

Best wishes, Clive
CliveI'll call you in the morning.

Best wishes, Clive

Interesting how "I'll see you on the morrow" became "I'll see you tomorrow".
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CliveHe called me on the morning of July 17th.

I'll call him on Tuesday morning.
1) What happens when I modify the morning in the former example with an adjective, e.g. late? Something tells me I should change the preposition back to in:

He called me in the late morning of July 17th.

2) Are the following examples correct?

He called me on a late morning. I think it was July 17th.
He called me one late morning. I think it was July 17th.

3) What if I want to speak about a night? Are these examples correct?

He called me at night.
He called me at night of July 17th.
I'll call him on Tuesday night.
He called me late at night of July 17th.
He called me on a cloudy night.
I think it was July 17th.
He called me one cloudy night. I think it was July 17th.

Note: I do know that people usually don't call one another at night (at least here in Europe) but I just wanted the "night" examples to be consistent with the "morning" examples. Emotion: wink

1) You have the wrong word order. At the moment, 'late' is modifying 'morning' and a morning itself can't be late, can it.

He called me late on the morning of July 17th.

2) He called me late in the morning. I think it was July 17th.

He called me late one morning. I think it was July 17th.

3. He called me at night. ok.

He called me on the night of July 17th

I'll call him on Tuesday night. ok

He called me late at night on July 17th.

He called me on a cloudy night. I think it was July 17th. ok
He called me one cloudy night. I think it was July 17th. ok

(I do know that people usually don't call one another at night (at least here in Europe) - actually, night is often used here to mean evening. It would be quite normal to say 'I'll call you tomorrow night' or 'let's get together Friday night'. It would just mean during the evening. In fact to say 'tomorrow evening' or 'Friday evening' would be very odd.)
1) You have the wrong word order. At the moment, 'late' is modifying 'morning' and a morning itself can't be late, can it. Well, if morning is a period of time lasting, say, from 4:00AM to noon, then the period from, say, 10:00 to noun could be a late morning. My dictionary lists these examples: late evening, late 18th century.
He called me late on the morning of July 17th.

2) He called me late in the morning. I think it was July 17th.

He called me late one morning. I think it was July 17th.

3. He called me at night. ok.

He called me on the night of July 17th

I'll call him on Tuesday night. ok

He called me late at night on July 17th.

He called me on a cloudy night. I think it was July 17th. ok
He called me one cloudy night. I think it was July 17th. ok

(I do know that people usually don't call one another at night (at least here in Europe) - actually, night is often used here to mean evening. It would be quite normal to say 'I'll call you tomorrow night' or 'let's get together Friday night'. It would just mean during the evening. In fact to say 'tomorrow evening' or 'Friday evening' would be very odd.) I knew that. To say "today evening" instead of "tonight" is odd as well, isn't it?
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True, you can have 'late morning' if you combine it with 'in the' but not 'on a'. 'In the' makes it clear that you are only talking about the latter part of the morning. 'On a' would mean the whole morning was in some way 'late'.

However, to say 'he called me in the late morning' sounds clumsy and native speakers would say 'he called me late in the morning'.
True, you can have 'late morning' if you combine it with 'in the' but not 'on a'. 'In the' makes it clear that you are only talking about the latter part of the morning. 'On a' would mean the whole morning was in some way 'late'. Agreed. My mistake - I should have used "on a cloudy morning" like in the night example.

However, to say 'he called me in the late morning' sounds clumsy and native speakers would say 'he called me late in the morning'. Yes, though I can imagine "in the late morning" in some novel (i.e. literary style).
<1) You have the wrong word order. At the moment, 'late' is modifying 'morning' and a morning itself can't be late, can it.>

It was a late morning in spring.
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