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What is the difference between "maximum" and "most" ?
1. "The most goals scored in a match is 5."
2. "The maximum temperature recorded is 50 C".
Both "maximum" and "most" seem to have the same meaning ?
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Comments  
Yes, they do. 'Maximum' often suggests an externally determined limit while 'most' often suggests a competitive achievement, however.
But, can we use "most" with all kinds of countable and uncountable nouns ?
For example, we can say "The maximum/minimum age at which a person has won this award is 56."
But can we say "The most/least age at which a person has won this award is 56" ?
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No, you cannot say the latter.
Okay, thanks MM.
Debpriya De "The maximum/minimum age at which a person has won this award is 56.
This should be "highest/lowest age at which..."

If you use maximum/minimum, it should read "The maximum/minimum age at which a person can win this award is 56."
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When has height measurement ever been applied to age? Also, given maximum/minimum in adjectival form means the greatest in (whatever measurement it relates to) and not the greatest possible (as is the case when it is in noun form) surely means the sentence was perfectly valid beforehand.
Slight correction: I said "height measuremen"t but this isn't what I intended. What I should have said was: when has the use of high/low ever been applied to age. Very sorry for not catching that before posting.
Hello,

Can can you say

The lowest/highest age at which one has one the award is.....

THank you
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