To Brits: Which American spellings look the most wrong to you, and which American spellings do you occasionally find yourself using?

To Americans: Which British spellings look the most wrong to you, and which British spellings do you occasionally find yourself using?
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To Americans: Which British spellings look the most wrong to you, and which British spellings do you occasionally find yourself using?

Most wrong: Tonne, Programme, the diphthongs (except aesthetic; esthetic looks ridiculous to me.)
Least wrong: the -gues, especially dialogue, which I find preferable to the American "dialog." In verb forms, however, the u goes (no dialoguing or dialogued.)
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To Brits: Which American spellings look the most wrong to you, and which American spellings do you occasionally find yourself using? To Americans: Which British spellings look the most wrong to you, and which British spellings do you occasionally find yourself using?

"Gaol" gets me every time. "Tyre" and "kerb" at least make phonetic sense to me. "Gaol" seems wrong on so many levels.

I had many English editions of children's books when I was young, so I picked up many of the extraneous u's (labour, colour, etc.), but "grey" has stuck with me.

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I had many English editions of children's books when I was young, so I picked up many of the extraneous u's (labour, colour, etc.), but "grey" has stuck with me.

I think I more naturally use 'grey' than 'gray'. I believe it may be J.R.R. "Ron" Tolkien's influence, as I read his books enthusiastically when I were a lad, and those books use the word 'grey' in just about every paragraph.
I tend to use spellings like 'travelling', 'travelled', that today are thought of as un-American. I believe I was taught to use those spellings in elementary school, but I could be mistaken about that.
To Americans: Which British spellings look the most wrong to you, and which British spellings do you occasionally find yourself using?

I'm not American, but I'm an American-speller, so I'll answer anyway. Of British spellings widely used in Canada, the ugliest for me is "cheque".

It does seem natural to me to spell "cancelled" with a double L, although I do not extend that privilege to "traveled".

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To Brits: Which American spellings look the most wrong to you, and which American spellings do you occasionally find yourself using?

In the first category, "skeptic" always looks like a typographical error to me.
In the second group, I find I use "-led" rather than "-t" for "spelt/spelled" and "learnt/learned" (but "leapt" rather than "leaped").
I believe the "-ed" forms are more typicaly American, but I'm not sure.

Cheers, Harvey
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On 19 Jun 2005, Nick Cassaro wrote

To Brits: Which American spellings look the most wrong to you, and which American spellings do you occasionally find yourself using?

In the first category, "skeptic" always looks like a typographical error to me. In the second group, I find I ... and "learnt/learned" (but "leapt" rather than "leaped"). I believe the "-ed" forms are more typicaly American, but I'm not sure.

Yeah, except for some, like burnt/burned which have different meanings.
To Brits: Which American spellings look the most wrong to you, and which American spellings do you occasionally find yourself using?

Most wrong: worshiped, kidnaped.
Used: most computer words. In fact, like many non-AmE speakers, I distinguish between 'programme' and 'program'.

Rob Bannister
To Brits: Which American spellings look the most wrong to you, and which American spellings do you occasionally find yourself using?

Most wrong: worshiped, kidnaped.

These aren't correct in any English dialect as far as I know, and may anyone who use them be arrested by the grammar police immediately. We Americans are much too lazy to double "l"s but we certainly take the time to double "p"s.
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