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A: I think we need to trust, moving forward, that decisions affecting the entire unit will not be made without discussion. (A tells this to B because B did something by himself that affected the entire unit. So A is warning him right now.

What does marked phrase mean here? How does marked phrase modify the sentence? Is it a reduced clause or participle?

Can I just use "moving forward" or "starting now" instead of "from now on" ?

a- You will report to me from now on.

b- You will report to me, starting now. (Is it okay to leave that phrase, starting now, like this?)

c- You will report to me, moving forward. (Is it okay to leave that phrase, starting now, like this?)

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mango pen 189

A: I think we need to trust, moving forward, that decisions affecting the entire unit will not be made without discussion. (A tells this to B because B did something by himself that affected the entire unit. So A is warning him right now.

What does marked phrase mean here? How does marked phrase modify the sentence? Is it a reduced clause or participle?

~ I think we need to trust, as we move forward, that decisions ....

'moving forward' is a participle clause. It's a separate clause. It doesn't modify anything.

mango pen 189

Can I just use "moving forward" or "starting now" instead of "from now on" ?

a- You will report to me from now on.

b- You will report to me, starting now. (Is it okay to leave that phrase, starting now, like this?)

c- You will report to me, moving forward. (Is it okay to leave that phrase, starting now, like this?)

Yes. All those substitutions are possible.

(You can also move those expressions to the beginning of your sentences.)

CJ

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Thank you. This sentence sounds awkward to me: "You will report to me, as you start now." or "You will report to me, as you are starting now." Therefore, "You will report to me, starting now." sounds awkward too.

mango pen 189This sentence sounds awkward to me: "You will report to me, as you start now." or "You will report to me, as you are starting now."

They sound awkward to me as well.

mango pen 189Therefore, "You will report to me, starting now." sounds awkward too.

The feeling will pass. This phrasing is perfectly natural.

CJ

Thank you. If you were to rewrite sentence b as you did rewrite sentence c, how would you rewrite it?


"You will report to me and you are starting now." (Is it okay to rewrite sentence b like this?)

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
mango pen 189If you were to rewrite sentence b as you did rewrite sentence c, how would you rewrite it?

I would not rewrite it. It has no paraphrase analogous to my paraphrase of 'moving forward'.

mango pen 189"You will report to me and you are starting now." (Is it okay to rewrite sentence b like this?)

No. It doesn't have the exact same meaning. Some phrases just can't be said in a different way unless you change them radically. For example, you can paraphrase 'starting now' as 'from now on', but that doesn't even have the verb 'start'.

That said, "and we are starting now" isn't too bad a paraphrase.

However, I don't understand why students want so many paraphrases of different expressions. Just memorize the expression as a fixed expression, and don't worry about the paraphrases. Nothing really bad is going to happen if you do it like that, and looking for all those paraphrases might just slow down your mastery of English.

CJ

We want to see how those fixed phrases is constructed. That is why we want paraphrases. If we keep memorize the expressions and never try to understand the structures, we could have hard time producing our own sentences/styles I suppose. Most of the time native speakers use shorter versions of sentences. We want to know where those shorter versions come from and how those sentences were edited to make them more practical.

Ah, but the "starting" and "ending" family of expressions doesn't fit into any process of shortening. Well, maybe if you study the history of English, you might find some archaic expressions from centuries ago that are related, but I don't know what those could be — if there are any.

starting now, starting tomorrow, starting next month, ...
ending now, ending tomorrow, ending next month, ...

CJ

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

Thanks. Could you give some examples that contain those expressions?

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