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Please I need help with this:

You use moving stress with some nationalities (ending in ese) and also with numbers (_teen, twenty-two)

Examples:

He's a Portugese writer.

We have fourteen children.

Am I right?

________________ . ________________

What about these examples? Do they have moving stress?

They are European capital cities.

It's an afternoon party.

It's a seventeenth century house.
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My opinions:

He's a Portugese writer.

We have fourteen children.

Am I right? -- Yes, but it is not universally done. It is not a rule, it is the physics of utterance production.

What about these examples? Do they have moving stress?

They are European capital cities. -- A bit, but not so strong-- the second adjective modifies the tendency

It's an afternoon party. -- Yes

It's a seventeenth century house.--Yes; here it is adverbial rather than another adjective (that is, it is the phrase 'seventeenth century' that is being affected)
Uh-oh! Uh-ooooh!

I never heard of this feature. Are you guys talking about stress that changes within a word?

19 = nineteen
99 = ninety-nine
1999 = nineteen ninety-nine<-- I usually hear years pronounced this way, and this is the way I pronounce them too.

I thought that was a kind of exception.
Could you guys tell me if there are others, and how to deal with this "moving stress"? I find this quite confusing. Are you telling me that I should move the stress in compound nouns like "Application Programming Interface"? I hope not! Emotion: crying

Thanks Emotion: smile
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I never heard of this feature.
Me neither. The stress is sometimes somewhere and then, in certain situations, it's somewhere else?

I'm sure someone will come by and rescue us eventually.

CJ
You must have met this before, Jim. Perhaps not as 'moving stress' (but nothing else comes to mind-- I remember the proposition only vaguely myself. It's not 'stress shift'-- that's what happens between the noun and verb for e.g. protest).

The idea is that word stress varies in context-- for what range of cases, I do not know, but the 'teens' are a memorable example:

In I am fourteen, the stress is on 'teen', but in We have fourteen children, the stress drifts forward to 'four'. I suppose here at least it has to do with another factor, that of 'number' + 'unit' generally bearing equal stress (as in two cents).
Phew, Jim, I was afraid I had found another weird feature and... I was going to lose a lot of time trying to understand it, LOL. Emotion: smile

I just checked M-W online, and I saw that numbers like "fourteen" can actually be pronounced in two ways, fourteen and fourteen. MW lists both. So I believe this is not a question of "moving stress"... They list two pronunciations with two different stresses for "Portuguese" too. So I guess this "moving stress" doesn't exist (I hope it doesn't, lol, I wouldn't understand it).
So what did you mean here, MM?
Mister MicawberThey are European capital cities. -- A bit, but not so strong-- the second adjective modifies the tendency

It's an afternoon party. -- Yes

Where does the stress change? I hope it doesn't Emotion: big smile
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For many speakers, the isolated afterNOON becomes, in context, AFternoon PARty.

Both 'moving stress' and 'changing word shapes' are certainly existing phenomena-- and exist probably in all languages, if one is observant.
Thanks, Mr. M.!

I don't think I often change the stressed syllable in my own speech. Maybe for fourteen and the like. But I think that I always say Portuguese and European and afternoon. Maybe that's my problem in imagining other variants.

CJ
I never heard of this feature.
I think this is what Michael Swan calls 'variable stress' in his Practical English Usage.
Japanese has the stress on the last syllable when the word is spoken alone: JapanESE; but when we say Japanese cooking, the stress moves to the first syllable: JApanese COOking.
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