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In fact, it leads to errors. Addressing someone as "Mrs ... avoids this. It removes the awkwardness. It is always correct.

Whilst agreeing with all the above, "Ms" has a pronunciation problem.

"Miz." No problem.
Also, I know quite a large number of married women who get quite angry when addressed, by voice or letter, as "Ms".

I can't imagine that I don't get angry when addressed as "Miss" or "Mrs." What is it about it that angers them?

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I can't imagine that I don't get angry when addressed as "Miss" or "Mrs." What is it about it that angers them?

It can't be worse than being called "Beat Nobs":
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R.
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In fact, it leads to errors. Addressing someone as "Mrs ... avoids this. It removes the awkwardness. It is always correct.

Whilst agreeing with all the above, "Ms" has a pronunciation problem. Also, I know quite a large number of married women who get quite angry when addressed, by voice or letter, as "Ms".

Oh, my sisters say that is just because those married women are afraid someone will expect them to act independently for once in their lives. After all, that title is their post-secondary degree, something to be proud of.
On a serious - and non-argumentive - note, I've always thought that "Ms" was one of the better products of the "hear me roar" movement.

You can think that. I'd say it's made things worse: we now have three ways of titling an untitled woman instead of two.

Do you view Mr, Mrs, Miss, or Ms as titles? I don't. I view them as forms of address.
I think the one word "Miss" should suffice for all women.

I think the people involved should have a say in the form of address. It's my hunch that "Miss" as the single form of address would be soundly beaten in any vote.
Anyway, whenever a form asks me for my "title" I always cross out that whole line.

Do you have a title that you are unwilling to provide, or are you just a bit cranky because you have nothing to fill in?
Anyway, whenever a form asks me for my "title" I always cross out that whole line.

Do you have a title that you are unwilling to provide, or are you just a bit cranky because you have nothing to fill in?

Even though the question was not addressed to me, I do have a title, but I find it as extreme bad taste to provideit, or flaunt it.

I have a cousin who has a PhD, not in medicine. Just to annoy her, I address the letters to "Dr. Rises" and I call her "Doctor".
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I was thinking about salutations... Mr is a shortened form of Mister, Dr is a shortened form of Doctor, of what is Mrs the shortened form? How do you spell Mrs?

Mistress (but not in its current usage).
The best guess I've got so far is Mister's (because the wife 'belongs' to the Mister - or at least that's a view that would have been held, say, 50 years ago).

Wives stopped being chattel slightly longer ago than that.
Truly Donovan
Lexy Connor mysteries: Chandler's Daughter, Winslow's Wife http://www.trulydonovan.com
Even though the question was not addressed to me, I do have a title, but I find it as extreme bad taste to provideit, or flaunt it.

I can't say for sure, but I suspect you are selective about providing it. If providing the title assures you of, or even assists you in, achieving what you want to achieve by submitting the form, I suspect you do provide it.
For example, if you are an attorney, and if you were to submit a letter to a company ordering a new dining room suite, I think you would eschew bad taste and not flaunt your title. However, if you were submitting a letter to the editor of a newspaper on a point of law, you would probably include your title.
The decision of providing or not providing a title is usually based on the circumstances rather than on taste. If you only withhold the title in circumstances where there is no particular gain other than the perceived gain of status, then you are acting out of practicality rather than as a demonstration of good taste.
I have a cousin who has a PhD, not in medicine. Just to annoy her, I address the letters to "Dr. Rises" and I call her "Doctor".

And, I would assume she uses that title selectively. If it's not on her mailbox, she isn't really exercising good taste as much as she is making a considered decision that "PhD' on the mailbox doesn't improve the postal service. When she registers for a seminar in her field, I suspect she flaunts away.
The best guess I've got so far is Mister's (because ... view that would have been held, say, 50 years ago).

Wives stopped being chattel slightly longer ago than that.

Some wives.

Reinhold (Rey) Aman
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Addressing someone as "Mrs Jane Jones" strongly implies that the person is married or that the person is assumed to be married..

Actually, in some circles the implication is that she is divorced. If she is still married to Mr Jones, she is Mrs Bartholomew Jones or Jane Jones, but never, never Mrs Jane Jones.

Truly Donovan
Lexy Connor mysteries: Chandler's Daughter, Winslow's Wife http://www.trulydonovan.com
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