Hello,

First of all I would like to apologise for my poor english and hope you will understand my question.

I have learned to write the opening greetings like that: "Mr Smith,". But people around me always put a point after the "Mr". So I never know what is correct. Could you please tell me? Do I have to write "Mr Smith," or "Mr. Smith," ? And is the rule the same for Mrs and Ms ? Many thanks in advance for your help.
1 2 3
AnonymousHello,

First of all I would like to apologise for my poor english and hope you will understand my question.

I have learned to write the opening greetings like that: "Mr Smith,". But people around me always put a point after the "Mr". So I never know what is correct. Could you please tell me? Do I have to write "Mr Smith," or "Mr. Smith," ? And is the rule the same for Mrs and Ms ? Many thanks in advance for your help.

Your English looks good to me! "Mr." should have the period (point). So should "Mrs." and "Ms.". "Miss" is a complete word, not an abbreviation, and shouldn't have the period. People will understand what you mean whether you have the period or not.
hi

so what does this abbreviation mean Ms.?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thanks Nef for your reply (happy to see that my english doesn't look too bad!). In the meantime I had a look in a book called "Students' companion" bought some time ago in England. There are some letter writing examples and they do actually not put a period after Mr (there is no example with Mrs or Ms but I suppose it would be the same). I know there are several differences between english and american language. So it may be correct not to put a period after Mr if I write to an english person...Is there any native english speaker who could give me his/her opinion?
Then, to answer Sadeem's question. I think that we use Ms when we do not know if a woman is married or not. Can somebody confirm?
Yes, you use Ms. if you don't know, but you also use it almost all the time in business correspondence. The marital status of the woman is not important to "business." You don't change how you address a man based on whether he is married or not, so many women prefer to be "Ms." at work.

In fact, it's a made up word and it's not really short for Mister or Mistress like Mr. and Mrs. are, but for consistency, the . after Ms. is usually used.
thanks for explaining Emotion: smile
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
As a side note, the BrE doesn't use any periods in the social titles-for example, Mr, Ms, and etc, but the AmE uses a period --Mr. ,Ms., and etc.
Yes; if you see "Mr" or "Mrs" or "Dr", the writer is likely to be BrE; but if you see "Mr." or "Mrs." or "Dr.", the writer isn't necessarily non-BrE!

MrP
MrPedanticYes; if you see "Mr" or "Mrs" or "Dr", the writer is likely to be BrE; but if you see "Mr." or "Mrs." or "Dr.", the writer isn't necessarily non-BrE!

MrP

hi what does BrE mean?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more