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In forms, such as application forms, should you put a Ms Miss. or Mrs. in front of your whole name?

If you choose to use Mrs., can it be used with your real name (as in Mrs. Winnie Smith instead of Mrs. John Smith)?

When is it appropriate for a married woman to use Ms? Should Ms be used without a dot, since it´s not an abbreviation. How about the use of capital letters (Mr in the middle of a sentence)?

This may all seem trivial and I have not given the use of Miss. or Mrs. much thought until I got married. Before that I used Ms, but was shocked to find out that the use of Ms is not accepted in all societies.

Hopefully I will earn a Ph.D. soon so that I can start using Dr., a whole lot less trouble.

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If you are married you can choose between Mrs. or Ms.

Mrs. tells the world you are married.

Ms is neutral regarding your marital state.

And yes, you can use Mrs. with your real name, the idea of having to put Mrs. John Smith is incredibly old-fashioned and looks bizarre.

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I was taught:

Ms. = When you're not sure if the person is married
Mrs. = When you're certain the person is married
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I don't know if it's the case in most languages and cultures but this whole question is quite a delicate one:

miss means you're unmarried, but that generally means you're young so it's kind of embarrassing for some ladies to stay miss into their old age, just because they've never married.

Don't forget that for centuries getting married and having a family was practically a sign of succeeding in life for many women!

ms is relatively recent and is used to avoid giving detail on your marital status. You can be a 'Ms' at any age, even if you're married.

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AnonymousMiss is for a young lady (teen and younger). When a girl becomes a woman it is Ms. or Mrs.
Mrs is an indication of marital status, not of age. A woman continues to be Miss until she dies if she does not marry.
Ms can be used by either an unmarried or a married woman.
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Yes, as a 21 year old or any twenty, thirty, forty something...you will be referred to either Miss, or Ms. based on your preference on how you wished to be perceived.

In any case of marriage, deceased or not, you then by title of law are referred to as Mrs.

In the case of divorce, you then are referred back into Miss, or Ms.

Ms. is commonly used when another person is not aware of your marital status or if you wish not to acknowledged as a 'single person'.

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Comments  
I am certain about how to use Ms, & Mrs, however is Miss used if she is a widow or in what way should Miss be used?
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Miss should only be used of a never married woman. A widow should still be referred to as Mrs.
Nona The BritAnd yes, you can use Mrs. with your real name, the idea of having to put Mrs. John Smith is incredibly old-fashioned and looks bizarre.

It's always safe to use Ms. especially if you're concerned with gender.

For example: Is Mrs. Jamie Smith a Jamie or is that her husband's name?
Miss is for a young lady (teen and younger). When a girl becomes a woman it is Ms. or Mrs.
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 Feebs11's reply was promoted to an answer.

I am a student in college, still senior, when I applied for the yasi test, I was puzzled by the words Miss and Ms.

I'm 21 years old, thanks for any replies!

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