+3

Hi, I'd greatly appreciate anyone's help.

What should I use for addressing to a woman in a cover letter when it does not tell us?
Ms, Mrs or Miss.

Dear madam/sir could be used if there was no name. However usually, there is a name e.g., Contact: Amanda Moore

1 2 3 4 5 6
Comments  (Page 3) 
Hi,

'Ma'am is something that should never be written. It's just a spoken form.

In writing, you would use the full form 'madam'. Today, that would normally be seen as very formal and quite old-fashioned. The term just survives in the standard greeting, 'Dear sir or madam'.

Best wishes, Clive
a lot is two words...not one. Another very common mistake.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Ms (has z sound)

Miss has the s sound Emotion: smile
Use Mrs. for widowed woman. A divorced woman can use Miss or Ms (being unmarried again).
Hi,

There are really no "rules" for such matters. Today, women have a great deal of freedom about these choices.

Bets wishes, Clive
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Glad to see I am not the only one to be confused about what to write when you don't know the marital status or age of a women. Ms. seems to be the way to go if in doubt.
Thanks

The general consensus in the American business world in my experience, and according to my Honors English instructor, seems to be that Ms. is pronounced "Miss" and should be used as the generic reference to any female whenever her marital status is not know, and also if it IS known that she is NOT married. Also it does not matter if she is divorced, she is still a "Miss/Ms.", as it is impolite to title her by the fact that she is divorced.

The only time when one can't be certain about the correct title is when the woman is widowed, in which case it depends upon her preference. Some widowed women like to go back to being called a "Miss/Ms." while others prefer to remain a "Misses/Mrs." This seems to depend somewhat upon whether or not the woman is interested in remarrying.

Mrs. means "Misses" and refers specifically and ONLY to a married woman.

Mz. is the only abbreviation that would be pronounced "Mizz" but it is archaic and is realistically never used anymore. In 12 years working in offices and customer service, I have NEVER even once seen Mz. used.

Also, nobody in America uses the term "master" for young men. This is also considered archaic and even arrogant by some. Young men are referred to as Mr., just as all men are.

I'd prefer if we just changed all the rules and used the simple "Mr" or "Ms" ALL THE TIME but old rules die hard.

Hi,
Since there seems to be a lot of misinformation here, let me put in my two cents.I'm afraid that some of your comments here are not correct. Don't discount the comments earlier in the thread. Here are just a few quick and brief comments.

The general consensus in the American business world in my experience, and according to my Honors English instructor, seems to be that Ms. is pronounced "Miss" Definitely not. It's pronounced with the Z sound, ie Mizzzz. and should be used as the generic reference to any female whenever her marital status is not know, and also if it IS known that she is NOT married. Also it does not matter if she is divorced, she is still a "Miss/Ms.", as it is impolite to title her by the fact that she is divorced. It depends on her preference, if it is known to you. The only time when one can't be certain about the correct title is when the woman is widowed, in which case it depends upon her preference. Some widowed women like to go back to being called a "Miss/Ms." while others prefer to remain a "Misses/Mrs." This seems to depend somewhat upon whether or not the woman is interested in remarrying. I think many divorced or widowed women would not like this remark. It shows a lot of presumption.

Mrs. means "Misses" and refers specifically and ONLY to a married woman. No, it's short for the archaic form 'Mistress'. And it can also be used by divorced or widoed women, if they wish.

Mz. is the only abbreviation that would be pronounced "Mizz" but it is archaic and is realistically never used anymore. In 12 years working in offices and customer service, I have NEVER even once seen Mz. used. It never has been used at all, to my knowledge. I think you are confusing is with Ms.

Also, nobody in America uses the term "master" for young men. This is also considered archaic and even arrogant by some. Young men are referred to as Mr., just as all men are. The quite archaic 'master' was used for young boys rather than for young men.

I'd prefer if we just changed all the rules and used the simple "Mr" or "Ms" ALL THE TIME but old rules die hard.

Best wishes, Clive

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
If you are divorced, which should you Ms, Mrs, or Miss?

Thanks,
Show more