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In addition, I learned so much from the other volunteers, the community members, and this family. I thought I was there to give, but I received so much more in return. This experience has inspired me to continue building houses for others. I hope it will also encourage my friends and family members to help out in the future.


Q. 'more' is a comparative form of an adverb 'much' ? Or 'more' is a noun?

Q. How can I identify 'more' as adverb or noun?

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The verb "receive" is always transitive (apart from unusual or specialised usages), so from this we know that "so much more" is its object, i.e. a noun phrase. Compare e.g. "I laughed (so much) more" or "I appreciated life (so much) more", where we have respectively an intransitive verb and a verb which already has its object ("life"), so "(so much) more" must be adverbial. With verbs that can be both transitive and intransitive there can be ambiguity. For example, at least with no more context, we cannot tell whether "so much more" in "I read so much more" is an object or is adverbial.

Comments  
HoonyQ. 'more' is a comparative form of an adverb 'much' ? Or 'more' is a noun?

It is not a form of "much". It is a noun here.

HoonyQ. How can I identify 'more' as adverb or noun?

By its role in the sentence, same as always. It is a direct object here, a noun.

 GPY's reply was promoted to an answer.