+0

He can speak French, much more English.
We have a right to our property, much more to our life.
I cannot bear to walk, much less run.
I cannot even read German, much less speak it.


At first glance, I thought those are a comma splice. But, they say those are grammatical.
I was wondering what I shall call them in a grammatical way. Could it be a comparative conjunction?
It is certain that those are adverbials which are optional elements in the sentences.

He can speak French. much more English.
We have a right to our property. much more to our life.
I cannot bear to walk. much less run.
I cannot even read German. much less speak it.

+1

I have never seen the version with 'much more'. I find it hard to assign a meaning to it that parallels the usage of 'much less'. Where did you get the idea that 'much more' is used in this pattern?

I only know the usage of 'much less' after a negation.

In any case, I've never heard that construction called by any particular label. You may as well call it whatever you like, including "the much less construction" or, as you suggest, a comparative phrase.

Maybe someone else can give you a better label for that kind of phrase. Wait for more replies.

CJ

+1
KeunChulLee1. He can speak French, much more English.
2. We have a right to our property, much more to our life.

The "much more" variant seems possible to me, though fairly uncommon. However, sentence (1) does not work very well for me. (2) seems OK to me.

To me, this pattern seems a shortened way of saying e.g. "I cannot bear to walk, (and) much less (can I bear to) run", and similarly for the others.

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Comments  
CalifJimI have never seen the version with 'much more'. I find it hard to assign a meaning to it that parallels the usage of 'much less'. Where did you get the idea that 'much more' is used in this pattern?I only know the usage of 'much less' after a negation.

Thank you for your comment, which made me think that those based on the usage of 'much more' after an affirmative could have been written in broken(?) English. Those are just the example sentences of a drill in English sentence patterns that I have.


121 ▶much [still] more ...

I like music, much more dancing.

=I like music, still more dancing.

Animals have right to live, much more men.

We have a right to our property, much more to our life.

He can speak French, much more English.

It is difficult to understand his books, much more his lectures.

I cannot bear to walk, much less run.

I cannot even read German, much less speak it.

=I cannot even read German still less speak it.

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KeunChulLeeThose are just the example sentences of a drill in English sentence patterns that I have.

OK. Thanks for getting back to me on that.

If I were constructing the drill, I'd leave out everything except the "much less" variant. It's just my personal opinion that the others aren't used enough to earn their place in a drill. There are many more important things to drill on. Emotion: smile

CJ

GPYTo me, this pattern seems a shortened way of saying e.g. "I cannot bear to walk, (and) much less (can I bear to) run", and similarly for the others.

Thanks for your help.

GPY1. He can speak French, much more English. 2. We have a right to our property, much more to our life.The "much more" variant seems possible to me, though fairly uncommon. However, sentence (1) does not work very well for me. (2) seems OK to me.

What do you think of these two sentences?

1. Animals have right to live, much more men.

2. It is difficult to understand his books, much more his lectures.

Does your gut feelings allow them?

KeunChulLee1. Animals have a/the right to live, much more men.
2. It is difficult to understand his books, much more his lectures.

(1) seems acceptable to me. It is a literary-sounding sentence. It is not something that would be used in everyday English. You might also see it written as "much more so men".

(2) is slightly problematic because of the negative nuance of "difficult to ~". I think some people might instinctively write this sentence with "much less" rather than "much more". In everyday English we may say "let alone his lectures".

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