I thought we had finally settled the muffin issue:
1) The (English) muffin - a doughy thing with holes in top for absorbingjam or honey or, for the younger, less cholesterol-challenged, butter. It must be toasted. Also known in some parts as a pikelet, which should not be confused with a Scotch pancake.

2) The (Old-fashioned) English muffin - a strange thing, somewhatresembling a dried out doughnut, sold AFAIK only in a few English shops and not very nice.

3) The American muffin - looks rather like an enormous cupcake, but isnot very sweet and, if badly made, can be completely tasteless. Probably the best thing to have come out of America in the last 50 years.

Now, however, I find the following strange sentence. I should point out that Jane Heller, an American writer, is one of my favourite authors when I want light entertainment, but this is odd:
"He was sitting at the kitchen counter, reading the L.A. Times, drinking coffee, and eating an English muffin. There were crumbs everywhere, including those pesky little seeds that regularly slough off the underside of English muffins."
(Jane Heller: The Secret Ingredient)
So what sort of muffins are these? Does anyone else know of an "English muffin" that has "pesky little seeds"?

Rob Bannister
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Now, however, I find the following strange sentence. I should point out that Jane Heller, an American writer, is one ... So what sort of muffins are these? Does anyone else know of an "English muffin" that has "pesky little seeds"?

She is referring to corn meal sometimes sprinkled on the baking sheet to prevent the dough from sticking which sometimes clings to the baked English muffin.
The inimitable Robert Bannister (Email Removed) stated one day
I thought we had finally settled the muffin issue:

"He was sitting at the kitchen counter, reading the L.A. Times, drinking coffee, and eating an English muffin. There were ... So what sort of muffins are these? Does anyone else know of an "English muffin" that has "pesky little seeds"?

The most well-known English muffin in the USA is Thomas'(R) English Muffin, a specific brand and the archetype for all the knockoff brands made. Those pesky little seeds are yellow and probably something like ground millet, not seeds at all; they give the muffin a feudal stone-oven feeling.
You can see the shape of one in the following images:

http://tinyurl.com/rzhq
http://www.wholepop.com/features/toasters/othertoaster3.htm http://www.foodservice.bestfoods.ca/product/index.cfm?category=14 http://www.eeecooks.com/recipes/2003/07/05/
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On 23 Oct 2003 01:43:44 GMT, CyberCypher
The most well-known English muffin in the USA is Thomas'(R) English Muffin, a specific brand and the archetype for all ... muffin a feudal stone-oven feeling. You can see the shape of one in the following images: http://www.wholepop.com/features/toasters/othertoaster3.htm http://www.foodservice.bestfoods.ca/product/index.cfm?category=14 http://www.eeecooks.com/recipes/2003/07/05/

That's no English Muffin; it's a barm cake!

Ross Howard
The inimitable "plep" (Email Removed) stated one day
She is referring to corn meal sometimes sprinkled on the baking sheet to prevent the dough from sticking which sometimes clings to the baked English muffin.

Ah, yes. Yellow corn meal it is. Cheaper than millet, I'm sure, and ubiquitous in the USA.
The inimitable Ross Howard (Email Removed) stated one day
The most well-known English muffin in the USA is Thomas'(R) ... of one in the following images: http://www.wholepop.com/features/toasters/othertoaster3.htm http://www.foodservice.bestfoods.ca/product/index.cfm?category=14 http://www.eeecooks.com/recipes/2003/07/05/

That's no English Muffin; it's a barm cake!

The American manufacturers call it "English" because it is so unlike any other bread product made in the USA, and because calling it "English" and putting that silhouette of a 19th-century carriage on the package gives it a certain snob appeal that fried bread and Bisquick(TM) lack. It's a doff of the topper to English class. Smile, don't complain.
And, yes, it does contain yeast, but so does all leavened bread.

For e-mail, delete the OBVIOUS intruders.
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3) The American muffin - looks rather like an enormous cupcake, but is not very sweet and, if badly made, can be completely tasteless. Probably the best thing to have come out of America in the last 50 years.

I think you've confused the American muffin with the American biscuit. Muffins can be quite large and extremely tasty.

Dena Jo
(Email: Replace TPUBGTH with denajo2)
on 23 Oct 2003:
3) The American muffin - looks rather like an enormous ... have come out of America in the last 50 years.

I think you've confused the American muffin with the American biscuit. Muffins can be quite large and extremely tasty.

Most American muffins made at home (does anyone do that anymore? I used to when I was in high school) are made in cupcake tins and are quite small. The monster muffins seen in coffee shops like Starbucks (there is even one here on my campus in backward southern Taiwan) are strictly commercial varieties sold mostly in coffee chops and fancy bakeries (which usually also sell coffee and have tables for fat- and sugar-addicted Americans to plop onto whilst stuffing themselves with useless but tasty calories).
Bisquits are fairly rare in the northeast but common in the south, the midwest and at all truckstops. Bisquits and gravy seems to me to be ironic soul food for white trash.

For e-mail, delete the OBVIOUS intruders and insert the OBVIOUS domain.
I thought we had finally settled the muffin issue: 1) The (English) muffin - a doughy thing with holes in ... must be toasted. Also known in some parts as a pikelet, which should not be confused with a Scotch pancake.

That's not a muffin, it's a crumpet, known in the North as a pikelet, and it's made of batter, not dough.
A muffin is a bread-like thing, same size as a crumpet but made of dough, not batter. It's split in half horizontally, toasted and eaten with jam or honey.
2) The (Old-fashioned) English muffin - a strange thing, somewhat resembling a dried out doughnut, sold AFAIK only in a few English shops and not very nice.

Don't think I've ever met one of these.
3) The American muffin - looks rather like an enormous cupcake, but is not very sweet and, if badly made, can be completely tasteless. Probably the best thing to have come out of America in the last 50 years.

Double chocolate-chip American muffin - mm.
Now, however, I find the following strange sentence. I should point out that Jane Heller, an American writer, is one ... English muffin. There were crumbs everywhere, including those pesky little seeds that regularly slough off the underside of English muffins."

Certainly never come across a muffin with seeds on the outside. Muffins are very floury on the outside though and do tend to slough flour when eaten carelessly.

Alison
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