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Question #1 The girl cried (1 on2 with 3 to 4 at) the sight of a snake.
Question #2 Many Japanese immigrated to Hawai and California in (1search2pursue3chase3hunt) of a better life.


Obviously, the answer for Question #1 is 4 and for Question #2 it's 1. However, I'm curious how you native speakers would interptret:

The girl cried on the sight of a snake.
The girl cried with the sight of a snake.
Many Japanese imigranted to Hawai and California in chase of a better life.
Many Japanese imigranted to Hawai and California in hunt of a better life.

Or do they not make any sense at all? If not, then why?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
As to "pursue/pursuit", it gives me the image of people trying desperately, all their life long, to reach some ideal, but never getting it.
is it correct?
Hello Taka

I think I must have been using a different numbering system (!) from you, so will recapitulate here:

Question #1 The girl cried (1 on2 with 3 to 4 at) the sight of a snake.

1. quite strange 2. quite strange 3. not good 4. fine.

Question #2 Many Japanese immigrated to Hawai and California in (1search2pursue3chase3hunt) of a better life.

1. fine 2. not good (change to pursuit) 3. very odd 4. very odd.

Sorry about my misnumbering...

MrP
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
That's OK, MrP.

I know they are strange or odd.

I'm just interested in your interpretation and why it's strange or odd.
Hello Taka

Ah! I should have read your question more carefully.

Question #1 The girl cried (1 on2 with 3 to 4 at) the sight of a snake.

1. 'on': with 'cry + on + noun', I feel a need of something concrete, or an action, in the noun: 'she cried on receipt of his letter'. But I would not find a gerund strange: 'she cried on seeing the snake'.

2. 'with': this seems to suggest 'accompaniment'; whereas the crying followed the sighting.

3. 'to': 'to' seems to require something more concrete than a 'sight' of something: 'she cried to the snake' would be fine.

Question #2 Many Japanese immigrated to Hawai and California in (1search2pursue3chase3hunt) of a better life.

2. 'pursue': in+infinitive isn't possible.

3./4. in chase of/in hunt of: these suggest 'in quest of'. A better life is something you look for, but don't chase or hunt: those nouns suggest a destructive goal.

MrP
Jim, could you rephrase those four sentences for me?


Taka,

I would phrase them just as was shown in the answer key. There are really only two sentences.

Jim
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To Jim.
I would phrase them just as was shown in the answer key. There are really only two sentences.


Hmm...you said:
The others are off the track to the extent of being humorous


So I just wondered what the humorous points were of those 'wrong' sentences.

I'm still interested in your interpretation of:

Many Japanese imigranted to Hawai and California in chase of a better life.
Many Japanese imigranted to Hawai and California in hunt of a better life.
"in chase of" suggests they were wearing running shoes. Running faster and faster to catch something abstract (a better life) is, of course, an absurdity!

"in hunt of" suggests they were carrying rifles and intended to shoot and kill something abstract (a better life), another absurdity!

CJ
Yes. Literal interpretaion of them would be something like that. But isn't it possible to use both idioms as something more abstract, as in 'the hunt of the truth'?
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Hello Taka

If you wanted to use them as metaphors, you would have to use slightly different idioms:

1a. ...on the hunt for a better life.
1b. ...hunting down a better life.
2. ...chasing a better life.

'Hunt' probably has too aggressive a meaning to work with 'better life': it would be interpreted as CJ suggests (hunting to kill).

'Chasing' wouldn't be so bad, as we can talk about 'chasing dreams'. But again, the implication there is that the dream is always ahead of you; so it would be a somewhat gloomy metaphor!

MrP
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