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Question #1 The girl cried (1 on2 with 3 to 4 at) the sight of a snake.
Question #2 Many Japanese immigrated to Hawai and California in (1search2pursue3chase3hunt) of a better life.


Obviously, the answer for Question #1 is 4 and for Question #2 it's 1. However, I'm curious how you native speakers would interptret:

The girl cried on the sight of a snake.
The girl cried with the sight of a snake.
Many Japanese imigranted to Hawai and California in chase of a better life.
Many Japanese imigranted to Hawai and California in hunt of a better life.

Or do they not make any sense at all? If not, then why?
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Comments  
I'd say
"at the sight"
and
"in search"...
Ah, yes, Pieanne, but the question is, how would you interpret these ones?

. . .cried on the sight of a snake.
. . . cried with the sight of a snake.
Many Japanese immigrated . . . in chase of a better life.
Many Japanese immigrated . . . in hunt of a better life.

To me "on the sight" sounds odd. "sight" refers to eyes, and eyes look at a target, no on top of a target. "with the sight" sounds odd, too, for the same reason. "in chase" and "in hunt" sound OK, but not within that context. Something to do with the meaning of pursue, as in run after life and pursue and kill life.
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Sorry, Casi, didn't mean to intrude...
I couldn't have interpreted the first one.
For the second one, I would have said that in both "hunt" and "chase", there was an undertone of urge that didn't go with the sentence.
For the second one, I would have said that in both "hunt" and "chase", there was an undertone of urge that didn't go with the sentence.


I like that answer. Emotion: smile

Intrude? You, Pieanne? Neeeever.
The first is close enough to "on seeing a snake" to be excusable in one who is still learning English.
The others are off the track to the extent of being humorous, especially "in chase of a better life". In an effort not to embarrass the non-native speaker I would certainly hold my laughter under control, but it might not be easy!

CJ
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Jim, could you rephrase those four sentences for me?
For Q1, I find A1 not entirely strange (cf. 'she cried on receiving the letter': no 'the'), and A2 probably not quite as strange as CJ does (cf. 'with the approach of spring, she found she kept on crying') – but they're still strange.

For Q2, the meaning is clear in A1 and A2, but they are distinctly odd to my BrE ears: I would presume they'd come out of Babelfish. Though the original A2, 'pursue', is almost 'pursuit', which would be fine.

For Q2, I would also change 'immigrated to' to either 'immigrated into' or 'emigrated to'; though that may simply be personal, rather than necessary.

MrP
MrP, what about A3 and A4 of Q2? How do you interpret them?
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