hello;
Is "multiply yielding" a senseful english phrase nearly meaning "in a bride sense fruitful"? Is "multiply" the adverb of "multiple"? And is the construction "multiply yielding" grammatically correct?

Many thanks to all answering native speakers. And thanks to all others too!
Karsten Reincke (Email Removed)'s wild thoughts were released on Mon, 20 Oct 2008 23:16:41 +0200 bearing the following fruit:
hello; Is "multiply yielding" a senseful english phrase nearly meaning "in a bride sense fruitful"? Is "multiply" the adverb of "multiple"? And is the construction "multiply yielding" grammatically correct? Many thanks to all answering native speakers. And thanks to all others too!

I can only speak for myself but "multiply yielding" means nothing to me. I can't imagine a context where it would make sense either.

Jan Hyde (VB MVP)
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Jan.Hyde
On 21 Oct 2008 "Jan Hyde (VB MVP)"
hello; Is "multiply yielding" a senseful english phrase nearly meaning ... all answering native speakers. And thanks to all others too!

I can only speak for myself but "multiply yielding" means nothing to me. I can't imagine a context where it would make sense either.

I think he means "a multiplying process which yields ..."

With best wishes,
Peter.

Peter, \ / \ Prestbury, Cheltenham, Glos. GL52 Anne \ / \ England. and / / \ > > >\ > / \ http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk family / \ / \ / > \> \ / \ (Email Removed).
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hello; Is "multiply yielding" a senseful english phrase nearly meaning "in a bride sense fruitful"? Is "multiply" the adverb of "multiple"? And is the construction "multiply yielding" grammatically correct? Many thanks to all answering native speakers. And thanks to all others too!

'Senseful' doesn't exist. 'Intelligible' is better.

Your phrase is grammatically correct but awkward. Yes, 'multiply' is the adverb of 'multiple', meaning 'in different ways' or 'in different respects'. Anything starting with 'multi' is from Latin (as you probably know) and such words are often the most uninteresting ones to an English speaker; the least poetic. Bankers use 'multi'.
'Yield' is a beautiful word. 'Yielding', in the sense in which you're using the word, is most commonly used in farming. To speak of your bride's yield - meaning her offspring, her children - is to reduce (or possibly promote) her to the status of a farm animal. Did you really mean to use the word 'bride'? To describe someone as yielding, usually means they give way, they submit.
The fact that you're using the words 'multiply' and 'fruitful' so close together suggests that you are thinking of God's injunction to Adam and Eve, 'Be fruitful, and multiply'. This is the verb 'multiply': not the adverb.
Peter
Is "multiply yielding" a senseful english phrase nearly meaning "in a bride sense fruitful"? Is "multiply" the adverb of "multiple"? And is the construction "multiply yielding" grammatically correct?

I assume you mean "broad," not "bride."
Yes, "multiply" is the correct adverb form of "multiple," but it's rare outside technical jargon. I'd guess "multiply yielding" might be meaningful in horticultural jargon (several fruits per flower? several flowerings per season?), but not in general use.
¬R
Is "multiply yielding" a senseful english phrase nearly meaning "in ... of "multiple"? And is =the construction "multiply yielding" grammatically correct?

I assume you mean "broad," not "bride." Yes, "multiply" is the correct adverb form of "multiple," but it's rare outside technical jargon. I'd guess "multiply yielding" might be meaningful in horticultural jargon (several fruits per flower? several flowerings per season?), but not in general use.

It makes a sort of sense in the bridal sense, too. Very fecund, lotsa sons and daughters.
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Can you use it in a sentence?
I can only speak for myself but "multiply yielding" means nothing to me. I can't imagine a context where it would make sense either.

I think he means "a multiplying process which yields ..."

Or something that yields multiple off-spring.
The problem with making an adverb out of multiple is that it looks like the verb multiply. Normally, I'm not stymied by words that can be either of two parts of speech, but when it's in a phrase that I don't recognize either, it can be a problem. It looked something like "multiply yield".