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Hello teachers,

I come across the following sentence, "Much as I like ice-cream, I couldn't eat any more, thank you."

1. Is the original sentence"As much as I like ice-cream, etc."?

2. If so, why did the first "As' get omitted?

3. What does this structure/rule call in English?

4. Can we use "Many" in such a structure but with a different noun. Ex, "Many as I have pens, I don't use them all."?


Thanks in advance

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Moonrise1. Is the original sentence "As much as I like ice-cream, etc."?

I suppose you could look at it that way. I would just say that the initial "as" is implied.

Moonrise2. If so, why did the first "As' get omitted?

Somebody thought it was unnecessary. It was probably somebody important, and a long time ago. And a lot of others agreed because they looked up to this person, and they decided that they, too, would drop the initial 'as' now and then as the mood struck them. In other words normal linguistic evolution caused the 'as' to be dropped.

Moonrise3. What does is this structure/rule call called in English?

It doesn't have an official name, so we just use everyday words to describe it and say it's omitting a word.

Moonrise4. Can we use "Many" in such a structure but with a different noun. Ex, "Many as I have pens, I don't use them all."?

I have to say 'no' because I've never heard or seen that one, but let us know if you find an example. Emotion: smile

CJ

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MoonriseI come across the following sentence, "Much as I like ice-cream, I couldn't eat any more, thank you."

(as) much as I like ice cream... means something like "although I really like ice cream". It's common to leave out the first as.

MoonriseCan we use "Many" in such a structure but with a different noun. Ex, "Many as I have pens, I don't use them all."?

That is not correct, even with as at the beginning. You need As many pens as I have (~"although I have many pens"), I rarely use them, but you can't omit as here; that's only possible with much. Don't ask me why, though!

CalifJimSomebody thought it was unnecessary. It was probably somebody important, and a long time ago. And a lot of others agreed because they looked up to this person, and they decided that they, too, would drop the initial 'as' now and then as the mood struck them. In other words normal linguistic evolution caused the 'as' to be dropped.

This rings true.

CalifJim
Moonrise1. Is the original sentence "As much as I like ice-cream, etc."?

I suppose you could look at it that way. I would just say that the initial "as" is implied.

Moonrise2. If so, why did the first "As' get omitted?

Somebody thought it was unnecessary. It was probably somebody important, and a long time ago. And a lot of others agreed because they looked up to this person, and they decided that they, too, would drop the initial 'as' now and then as the mood struck them. In other words normal linguistic evolution caused the 'as' to be dropped.

Moonrise3. What does is this structure/rule call called in English?

It doesn't have an official name, so we just use everyday words to describe it and say it's omitting a word.

Moonrise4. Can we use "Many" in such a structure but with a different noun. Ex, "Many as I have pens, I don't use them all."?

I have to say 'no' because I've never heard or seen that one, but let us know if you find an example.

CJ

Got it!

Thanks a lot for answering all my question. It was unfamiliar structure to me so when I read it in the first time, I felt there was something missing.

About "Many as" structure, you won't find it of course because, I made it up. But who knows maybe one day it would become an example due to normal linguistic evolution. 🙃


Thanks again

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lOvVraTESsS1110
MoonriseI come across the following sentence, "Much as I like ice-cream, I couldn't eat any more, thank you."

(as) much as I like ice cream... means something like "although I really like ice cream". It's common to leave out the first as.

MoonriseCan we use "Many" in such a structure but with a different noun. Ex, "Many as I have pens, I don't use them all."?

That is not correct, even with as at the beginning. You need As many pens as I have (~"although I have many pens"), I rarely use them, but you can't omit as here; that's only possible with much. Don't ask me why, though!

Clear! Thank you very much.

lOvVraTESsS1110
CalifJimSomebody thought it was unnecessary. It was probably somebody important, and a long time ago. And a lot of others agreed because they looked up to this person, and they decided that they, too, would drop the initial 'as' now and then as the mood struck them. In other words normal linguistic evolution caused the 'as' to be dropped.

This rings true.

May I ask a question, please. In your context, you used "ring" as a verb. You meant to use a metaphor. Right?

You didn't want to write, for instance, "This ring is true".


Thank you

Moonrise"ring" as a verb

There is no need for metaphor. The dictionary is your friend. Use it.

"to have a sound or character expressive of some quality // a story that rings true" ( https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ring )

Moonrise"This ring is true".

No, but there is a way to use the noun: "This has the ring of truth about it."

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anonymous
Moonrise"ring" as a verb

There is no need for metaphor. The dictionary is your friend. Use it.

"to have a sound or character expressive of some quality // a story that rings true" ( https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ring )

Moonrise"This ring is true".

No, but there is a way to use the noun: "This has the ring of truth about it."

I thought it's metaphor because, it seamed to me it is especially that metaphor has types. The verb "ring" is usually used with the noun "bell" like to say :"A bill rings." It's a characteristic of a bill. So when he/she said "This rings true", referring to the teacher's answer, it seemed that he/she borrowed one characteristic of a bill and added it to the "answer/speaking".

"Your answer/speaking rings true." It's beautiful actually. It strengthens the meaning. We use the same term in my language. That's why I was wondering if he/she used it as metaphor.


Thanks for your answer

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