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My car just up and died on me.

Can you please tell me the meaning of this sentence? I have no clue what it could mean.
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Hi you two,
"Up and Xed" is pretty common in casual speech.

He just up and walked out on me!
She just up and slapped his face!

Unexpectedly and without any prior indication that it was going to happen.

If the car had been working poorly for the previous few weeks, you wouldn't say this.
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Hi Gary,

It's a figure of speech; it just means that the car broke down or is no longer working. I'm pretty sure there is a word missing there though. I have never heard "just up" - the missing word could well be: just GAVE up and died on me.
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The goole hits lots of results for the keyword "My car just up and died on me". So I don't think something is missing out on this sentence. And finally, as per your explanation, I conclude that "My car up and died" means "my car broke down". Is it correct?
I also googled it and went to read it in context and you're right, Gary, apparently there is nothing missing! It seems to me that "just up" is the equivalent of "suddenly". I had never heard it until now. I'm not saying it is correct or incorrect, it's just being used. Could be regional, could be generational, who knows. One thing's for sure: it's definitely "slangish"; Emotion: stick out tongue

Your conclusion is almost accurate, just add the suddenly or unexpectedly. Emotion: wink
Hmmmm... now you got me thinking how this came to be. I wonder if it's a case of "corruption". One of the ways a language evolves is through errors; could be in spelling or in comprehension, transcription, and hearing. Think about it. "Just up" doesn't really make sense. I wonder if person 1 said something like: "just stopped" and person 2 heard "just up" and then spread the incorrect form through writing.

I remember a guy, a native speaker of English, writing: "To eaches own". Hope that never spreads! Emotion: big smile
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 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.
Well, do you know what this means?

I'm old!Emotion: crying

I'm pretty sure I have never heard it in Canada or the U.S. though. Emotion: hmm I'm going to be on the look out from now on.
I'm amazed at how often I hear and read this expression now. Emotion: smile
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I hear/use it frquently.
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