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Hi,
I remeber I once read (in Amercan Accent Training) that when you say what your name is, like "My name is Earl", you should stress "my", not "name". I'd never heard that... and I was surprised, since here in Italy every teacher makes you say "My name ease Earl", stress on name and Earl, lol.
I have to say I've never read the part about sentence stress very carefully... it was a mess. I prefer to pick up "the rules" while listening. So I never know where to put the stress in a sentence... I just hope it sounds good and say it the way it sounds best to me.
But now I'd like to ask about this: in sentences like...

-My name is Earl, and I live in Santa Monica
-My car is over there
-Your dog is so ugly
-Our sister just sold our old car

...is the stess on the possessive adjective or on the following word?

I think I always stress the following word, unless there's a good reason to emphasize the possessive adjective, and unless the possessive adjective is at the beginning of a sentence.
If it's at the beginning, I think I stress either the adjective or the noun, without following any apparent rules. Maybe I tend to stress the adjective more often, but I'm not sure.

Any comments? Thanks in advance Emotion: smile
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I think I always stress the following word, unless there's a good reason to emphasize the possessive adjective
This is correct. And being sentence initial is not a good reason to emphasize the possessive adjective. Stress the adjective only if it's contrastive or it's the topic of discussion.

-- Somebody just ran into your car.
-- That's not my car.
-- You're lucky. I'm glad it's not my car either. I'd be hopping mad if it was my car.

-- Whose car are we taking?
-- It doesn't matter. If you want, we can go in my car.

CJ
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Thanks, I see...

Does that mean that you would stress "name" if you had to say:

"My name is Jim"

??? I think I hear it both ways, either "my" or "name".

Emotion: smile
Does that mean that you would stress "name" if you had to say:

"My name is Jim"
Yes.

CJ
Hmm, how strange. I think I hear it both ways, I wonder why, LOL.
Anyway, thanks a lot... If I hear something related to this question and I have time, maybe I might remember to post some audio clips. Then we would have something specific to comment on. Emotion: smile
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